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Dr. Pat
Dr. Pat, Bird Veterinarian
Category: Bird
Satisfied Customers: 4244
Experience:  25+ years working primarily or exclusively with birds
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Hi my african grey parrot has a growth just beside the corner

Resolved Question:

Hi my african grey parrot has a growth just beside the corner of her mouth my vet has removed it 3 times and now it is growing back again, she hasbeen prescribed baytrol, metcam,plus chioramphenicol drops.can you help please
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Bird
Expert:  replied 3 years ago.

Greetings, I am Dr. Pat. I have worked with birds for many years. I will do my best to help you.

I am sorry no other expert has taken your question. We all come online at different times, I have just logged in and saw that you have not been answered. I hope I can still be of assistance.


Can you upload a photo, or describe this growth more specifically? Smooth, rough, firm, soft, color, size, appearance etc?

If it has been removed 3 times, did the vet not send out a biopsy sample? That would be the best diagnostics.

If this growth is not caused by a bacterial infection suseptibe to the baytril and chloramphenicol, the medications will not help, may be inappropriate, or even be harmful/contraindicated.

This location is a common site for keratinized "horns" that grow outward. They are not dangerous and unless are a problem, are injured, or interfere with eating, they can be left alone. Eventually they drop off on their own.

Viral infections, fungal infections, parasitic infections can cause growths in the corner of the mouth.

Nutritional deficiencies can cause very hard growths.

Cancer is not uncommon in these tissues.

Bot***** *****ne, the mass needs to be sent to a parrot-experienced veterinary pathologist for biopsy. Then appropriate treatment can follow.


I really must stress that you need a bird-experienced person, and not just a vet who advertises that they care for birds.

You may need to take your parrot for second opinion with an avian-experienced veterinarian ASAP for complete examination, diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Check

http://www.theparrotsocietyuk.org/index.php/Avian_Vets/28

http://www.avianveterinaryservices.co.uk/

http://www.birdvet.co.uk/

http://alanjonesbirdvet.yolasite.com

http://www.cjhall-vets.co.uk/index.asp

www.marknelsonvet.co.uk

www.arkpetsonline.co.uk

www.riversideanimalcentre.org

for members of AAV in your area or call your regular vet and see who they recommend; ask if they really have worked with birds a lot. Unfortunately, this list does not rate competency or experience, but is only a starting place; the vets at least take the avian medicine journal and hopefully see a bird or two a year. The best referrals are word-of-mouth, so check with several non-bird vets, the humane society, parrot rescue groups, bird clubs, etc. for their input. As you might guess there may be controversy and varying opinions even with this. Even board-certified avian specialists may not have a lot of practical bird experience. Unfortunately there are few resources available to refer you to really good, clinically-experienced bird vets.

Biopsy is necessary.

If she were my patient, and money no object, I would start with complete fecal analysis and direct smear,
stained with Sedi-stain and unstained for multiple parasites, fungi, spirals; direct smear stained with Sedi-stain and unstained of the oral cavity; bacterial culture and sensitivity of the feces and choana. Depending on the case I might do a fungal culture. Routine blood work is necessary to rule out other issues. There are MANY DNA/RNA tests for bird diseases. Ultrasound is often more informative than radiographs and does not require anesthesia (ask your vet about this option). Generally I start them out on medications as indicated by the tests.





Here are a few suggestions that I give everyone: important!

The following guidelines help with basic issues such as nutrition, obesity, good immune status. Surprising how the following can make a bird healthy, and how infrequently birds are ill if they are on the following regimen. No amount of medicine is going to work if the birds' basic needs are not met.

AAV Guidelines

African Greys should be on a high-quality, preferably prescription, pelleted diet: I prefer High-potency Harrison's
http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/products/harrisons.html

http://www.hbf-uk.co.uk/

http://www.mah-shop.com/


TOP
http://totallyorganics.com/t-pellets


In addition, they should be offered dark leafy greens, cooked sweet potatoes, yams, squash, pumpkin; entire (tops and bottoms) fresh carrots and so forth. No seeds (and that means a mix, or millet, or sprays, etc. etc.) and only healthy, low-fat high fiber people food. A dietary change should be closely monitored and supervised by your avian vet.

Daily Maintenance

Birds should get 12-14 hours dark, quiet, uninterrupted sleep at night. Any less and they can suffer from sleep deprivation and associated illnesses. They should be covered or their cage placed in a dark room that is not used after they go to bed.

The cage material should be cleaned everyday, and twice a day if the bird is really messy. Paper towels, newspaper, bath towels are ok. Never use corn cob, sawdust, wood chips, or walnut shell.
Food and water dishes should be cleaned and changed daily. Keep one set cleaned while the other is in use.

Fresh, perishable food should be placed in separate food bowls. Remove fresh food from the cage after a couple of hours to avoid spoilage.

Change cage papers daily, and clean the grate and tray weekly.

Clean food debris or droppings from toys and perches as needed (which can be as often as once a day).

Grit is not necessary for birds, and will cause digestive problems and death. The best sources of minerals (and vitamins) are leafy greens. Never give grit, gravel sandpaper or cement perches. A bird will eat those to excess when it is not feeling well or if there is a nutritional deficiency. They do not need it at all (an old myth from the poultry days, even poultry do not need it). It can cause an impaction and lead to serious or fatal consequences.
Dr. Pat and other Bird Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Hi Dr Pat,re Georgie the gray parrot,the growth seems to reappear after 10-14 days of removal, its rough, grey,and softish at the moment its between 6-8 mm and looks horn like,my vet is refering her to a specielist vet,and sending the info on all they have done,it is loose at the moment,should i try and remove it.thanks for your help. Keith Cole