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Dr. Phil, MD
Dr. Phil, MD, Medical Doctor
Category: Cardiology
Satisfied Customers: 56541
Experience:  Cardiology Expert
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Dear Doctor I am male 64 years of age, (I don't smoke or

Resolved Question:

Dear Doctor I am male 64 years of age, (I don't smoke or take alcohol) I was diagnosed with Atriall Fibrillation in May of this year, I have seen the cardiologist at our local hospital and I am due to have a cardioversion in 10 days time, this will be
my 3rd cardioversion since 2007. I was 1st diagnosed with AF in 2007 and had a successful cardioversion and was free of AF until May 2013, I had another Cardioversion in January 2014 and was free of AF until May 2015. My cardiologist has put me on 20mg of
Rivaroxaban daily, plus 2.5mg Bisoprolol beta blocker, i also take 4mg of Perindopril which I have been taking since 2006 for High blood pressure. I have an Omron blood pressure monitor, and my blood pressure is around 135/85. My resting pulse is around 62
BPM. When I take the beta blocker my pulse rate is reduced to around 55/54 BPM and it makes me feel dizzy and light headed. I was rather surprised to have been put on a beta blocker, as I thought this kind of medication was more of a rate control drug, and
only prescribed to those with a fast heart beat? For 2 days last week I never took my beta blocker, and I actually felt much better, prior to that my blood pressure reading was around 95/65 and felt weak and dizzy. My main question is by taking the beta blocker
does it play an important role in my cardioversion procedure? If so I would persevere with it until I have my cardioversion. Look forward to hearing from you.
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Cardiology
Expert:  Dr. Phil, MD replied 2 years ago.
No it doesn't. It is meant to control heart rate only Call and ask the doctor to reduce dose
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Expert:  Dr. Phil, MD replied 2 years ago.
Please don't forget a positive rating.
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