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Dr. Lee
Dr. Lee, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat
Satisfied Customers: 5355
Experience:  8 years of experience in veterinary medicine and surgery
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Weve just had to remove a large piece of solid fecal matter

Customer Question

We've just had to remove a large piece of solid fecal matter from what appears to be our cat's vaginal opening. She's got unusually large genitals, which our vet tells us is a congenital defect. We're very puzzled by this, please help.
Submitted: 4 years ago.
Category: Cat
Expert:  Dr. Lee replied 4 years ago.

Dr. Lee :

Hi. I'm Dr. Lee and will do my best to help.

Dr. Lee :

Can you tell me if your vet had taken any radiographs or ultrasound for Amber? Or any imaging studies for that matter?

Dr. Lee :

Did your vet tell you if there are any other defects?

Dr. Lee :

Also, how old is Amber?

Dr. Lee :

It appears that you are currently offline. If you can please provide the above information so I can better understand the problem and help. When you do reply, I will do my best to return to this chat as soon as I can. Thanks!

JACUSTOMER-n45ch1iw- :

Our vet did mention that there might be additional defects. No he hasn't taken an xrays or ultrasounds of her. Amber is about 16 weeks old now. From looking around the internet I'm starting to think she might have a rectovaginal fistula. It's pretty much the only thing I can think of that would cause this effect.

Dr. Lee :

Thanks for the info.

Dr. Lee :

and sorry for the delay in replying. We must be in opposite time zones.

Dr. Lee :

For Amber, I do think that your research is correct. The most likely problem is a communication between the rectum and the vagina, and most likely is a genetic defect, though trauma can result in this as well.

Dr. Lee :

The best thing to do is to ask your vet to start with a rectal exam first to see if the defect can be located. If not, then contrast imaging studies or ultrasound will be needed.

Dr. Lee :

Once the deef

Dr. Lee :

Once the defect is located, surgery is the only way to correct it. Without surgery, it can lead to various infections of the urinary tract and the uterus.

Dr. Lee :

Does this help? Do you have any other questions or concerns?

JACUSTOMER-n45ch1iw- :

No, thanks. We've been to see our vet, who has referred us to a surgeon.

Dr. Lee :

I hope Amber will get better soon!

Dr. Lee :

Please let me know if you have any other questions or concerns!

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