How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. John Your Own Question
Dr. John
Dr. John, Texas Veterinarian
Category: Cat
Satisfied Customers: 11385
Experience:  Over 14 years of clinical veterinary experience
11664588
Type Your Cat Question Here...
Dr. John is online now

My 17 year old cat has suddenly, in the last 48 hours, lost

Resolved Question:

Hi. My 17 year old cat has suddenly, in the last 48 hours, lost weight, starting drinking and urinating lots, become quite poorly groomed and wobbly on her feet, and I suspect the onset of kidney failure. Is there anything I can do?
Submitted: 1 month ago.
Category: Cat
Expert:  Dr. John replied 1 month ago.

Hello. Thanks for writing in. My name is***** and I would be happy to help you. I am not set up to do phone calls but would be happy to answer any questions you do have online. Kidney failure would be my first concern, but I would also be concerned about diabetes and hyperthyroidism. None of these issues are curable, but they are manageable. Kidney failure would carry the worse prognosis because sometimes it is too far advanced for any treatment to help. I would have your vet run some blood work. If it is hyperthyroidism, then they can start medication that should help, but it is a lifelong medication. If it is diabetes, then he needs to start insulin. That can be more difficult to manage at times. If kidney failure, then he needs to be started on intravenous fluids and hospitalized to bring down the kidney enzymes, medications to control electrolyte values, anti-nausea medications if needed and a special diet. If the fluids do not bring down the kidney enzymes, then the prognosis would be poor. Please let me know if you have any other questions or concerns. Hope this helps.

My goal is to make sure that you get all your question answered and all the information you need. IF YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH MY ANSWER, PLEASE RATE IT. Rating it is the only way I get compensated for helping you, and we can still continue our conversation after rating. If you feel like it is not helpful to you, or if there is more information you need, please respond back to me before rating. Asking more specific questions usually helps a lot. Realize that our conversation is not intended to diagnose or treat a condition. There has to be a valid veterinary-client-patient relationship established with an exam, according to law. You should always follow up with your vet.

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Many thanks. I agree with the advice. However I cannot get to the vet for another 48 hours which I accept may not be ideal but is there anything I can do myself at home with the cat until I can get to the vets?
Expert:  Dr. John replied 1 month ago.

You are welcome. Honestly, you are going to be hard pressed find anything that will help. It really depends on what is going on. All you can do is supportive care, which would include making sure she is eating and drinking. If her appetite is off, offer her anything, including canned tuna, salmon, chicken breast or canned food. She is drinking a lot, so you may not need to worry about that, but if she stops, try to give her water with a turkey baster to keep her hydrated. If not eating or vomiting, you can try Pepcid at 2.5 mg per 5-10 lbs of body weight daily. Otherwise, there is not much else you can safely do. Hope this helps.

My goal is to make sure that you get all your question answered and all the information you need. IF YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH MY ANSWER, PLEASE RATE IT. Rating it is the only way I get compensated for helping you, and we can still continue our conversation after rating. If you feel like it is not helpful to you, or if there is more information you need, please respond back to me before rating. Asking more specific questions usually helps a lot. Realize that our conversation is not intended to diagnose or treat a condition. There has to be a valid veterinary-client-patient relationship established with an exam, according to law. You should always follow up with your vet.

Dr. John and other Cat Specialists are ready to help you