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Ask Dr. D. Love Your Own Question
Dr. D. Love
Dr. D. Love, Doctor
Category: Dermatology
Satisfied Customers: 18536
Experience:  Family Physician for 10 years; Hospital Medical Director for 10 years.
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I get what I believe is called chicken skin on legs arms and

Customer Question

I get what I believe is called chicken skin on legs arms and back.(small dots or raised bumps)
Its got worse as I have got older (61).
Skin is dry and very itchy and sometimes red.
I have had this for many years always in winter or cold weather,tends to disappear in summer.
I have tried many types of moisturiser , I find anything that is Lanolin or Petroleum based makes the skin sting to a point where the itch is painful.Also tried emollients which is also very uncomfortable.
Cortisone cream works in short term when small areas are very bad.
Any advise please.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Dermatology
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
Could you attach a picture of this skin?
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
I had asked for a picture and have not heard back. The medical term for this condition is keratosis pilaris. Keratosis pilaris can occur as a sole condition or it can occur is association with other skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. I asked for a picture to see whether this appears as only keratosis pilaris or if there is any indication of another condition. For the keratosis pilaris, there are several products that can help to hydrate the skin. Commonly used options include lactic acid based products, such as Lac-Hydrin, alpha-hydroxy-acid lotions, such as Glytone, urea based creams, such as Carmol, or salicylic acid products, such as Salex lotion. It would also be an option to use a stronger steroid cream for short courses, such as triamcinolone cream. It also may help to bath in salt water, as salt water is better at hydrating the skin, while tap water tends to dehydrate the skin. Salt water can be accomplished by adding table salt or Epsom salts. If there is another condition present that is associated with the keratosis pilaris, then it may be necessary to treat that conditions to get good control of the keratosis pilaris. If I can provide any additional information, please let me know.

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