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Dr. Joey
Dr. Joey, Board Certified
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 4723
Experience:  15 yrs in practice, specialist canine/feline medicine
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My 12 year old XXXXX XXXXX/Yorkshire Terrier has developed

Resolved Question:

My 12 year old XXXXX XXXXX/Yorkshire Terrier has developed sclerosis of the lens, left
eye. Is it inevitable he will....
Go blind
Go blind in both eyes

Should we....
Stop him jumping,rough playing, running off lead,exposure to wind (car window), to try and delay luxation of the lens.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Dr. Joey replied 3 years ago.

Dr. Joey :

Hello I am Dr. Joey. Thanks for trusting me to help you and your pet today. I am a licensed veterinarian with over 15 years of experience. I look forward to working with you.

Dr. Joey :

All dogs develop lenticular sclerosis which is a natural scarring of the lens (actually it has to do with the fact the lens never loses any cells and over years of packing old cells into the center of the lens, it becomes a bit cloudy), but this does not cause blindness. Lenticular sclerosis certainly decreases the level of detail and acuity for a dog's vision, but does not lead to blindness. Now, if he has developed a cataract which is far different from sclerosis and not related, then that will cause blindness and is irreversible unless a dog has surgery.

Dr. Joey :

Some cataracts, if hereditary, may not involve the whole lens and in those cases dogs can see around the area that has a cataract. What is more common in older dogs is for the complete lens to develop a cataract. It is not a given that he will develop it in both eyes, unless he has diabetes and then usually a dog will do this in both eyes.


You are correct to be concerned about lens luxation in in the case of a cataract. This can happen and if does then requires you make a decision on what to do (surgery) because the eye can develop glaucoma (high intraocular pressures) secondary to this.

Dr. Joey :

I've thrown a lot your way. Please let me know your questions.

Customer:

The lens has already started to become wobbly, we really want to know if we can slow this condition

Dr. Joey :

If he has a cataract and the lens is already falling out of position, then it is luxated and there is nothing to stop/slow this process. This is an indication to have a consult with an opthalmologist. Time to discuss surgery. And he needs to have regular checks of his intraocular pressure to know when you might need to treat for glaucoma.

Dr. Joey :

It also means he probably cannot see from this eye.

Customer:

down, ie the lens detaching.

Customer:

Thank you, XXXXX XXXXX

Dr. Joey :

Yes, if the lens is already detached at one or more locations then this is irreversible and nothing to be done other than consultation for surgery and/or monitoring for glaucoma and treating when occurs. If the lens has not yet detached, it may not do so. It only usually detaches when a dog has a cataract (mature cataract)

Dr. Joey :

 


Please keep me posted. I am always happy to answer followup questions. You can reply to this question at any time to submit a followup. My goal is to provide you with excellent service today. If there’s anything else I can do, let me know – it’s been a pleasure working with you and I hope to assist you again soon! Kindly submit a rating as you exit our chat.

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