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Ask Dr Scott Nimmo Your Own Question
Dr Scott Nimmo
Dr Scott Nimmo, Small Animal Veterinary Surgeon.
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 20585
Experience:  BVMS, MRCVS. { Glasgow UK }
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My labrador is struggling on his back legs.

Resolved Question:

My labrador is struggling on his back legs.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Dr Scott Nimmo replied 3 years ago.

Scott Nimmo :

Hello and welcome. My name is XXXXX XXXXX I am an experienced small animal veterinary surgeon, I will be very pleased to work with you today and will try my best to answer your question to your satisfaction.

Scott Nimmo :

Can you tell me, did this happen suddenly or has it been coming on for a while?

Customer:

Its been coming on over a period of time but seems to have got a lot worse over the past week

Scott Nimmo :

Ok , thanks for that ... older labradors very often get problems with arthritis, this can be a primary condition or can often be secondary to diseases such as hip dysplasia.

Scott Nimmo :

To be honest your best plan would be to get a vet involved as prescription drugs such as Metacam can make quite a difference and make quite a difference to your dog's quality of life ...

Scott Nimmo :

However there are also home remedies you can try, I will list some ...

Scott Nimmo :

As far as human over the counter drugs go the choice would probably be glucosamine and aspirin, these can be given together and one may potentate the other, but you may find side effects with aspirin. Having said that some owners do use this combination.

1. Glucosamine can and frequently is given to dogs for joint pain and arthritis. Many vets will suggest the human formulation as it is cheaper, my personal advice to clients is that a typical dose rate would be :

For dogs 25 to 50 pounds (15 to 25 kg), Two capsules every 24 hours.

For dogs 50 to 100 pounds (25 to 50 kg), Three capsules every 24 hours.

{ Based on a 500 mg glucosamine formulation }

Products like glucosamine are on the borderline between being a drug and a food additive and are regarded as being extremely safe and unlikely to cause any side effect.

2. On a short term home remedy basis aspirin would be much safer and more effective than the other over the counter human pain killers and this drug is in fact sometimes prescribed for dogs. A typical dose rate would be is 5 mg per pound of your dog's body weight twice daily. The judgment whether to dose with aspirin is of course up to you but here is a link to a web page with all the facts you might need including contraindications : LINK

Customer:

Is there treatment available for this as and if so does it have a good results

Scott Nimmo :

That's really all your options, go for a vet check over if at all possible ...

Scott Nimmo :

Prescription anti-inflammatory drugs can really help, this is not a cure though they have to be given every day

Dr Scott Nimmo and 3 other Dog Specialists are ready to help you