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Dr. Welton
Dr. Welton, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 1452
Experience:  Licensed small animal veterinarian since 2002, practice owner since 2004.
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my dog keeps going vacant for a few minutes then comes back

Resolved Question:

my dog keeps going vacant for a few minutes then comes back to normal
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Dr. Welton replied 3 years ago.

Dr. Welton :

When you state "vacant," are your referring to a catatonic or unresponsive state?

Dr. Welton :

I see you are offline, so I will address your questions with the information I have. Assuming that by vacant, you are referring to a blank or unresponsive state, we would call that in medicine, catatonia. When I have seen this in dogs this age, it has commonly ultimately diagnosed as petite-mal seizures cause by epilepsy.

Dr. Welton :

With epilepsy, we most commonly associate the seizures it causes with convulsive activity. However, a focus in the brain that autonomously fires due to an focal abnormality in that region, could manifest in any number of ways, depending what body systems that particular area of the brain controls or regulates. Thus, I have seen some epileptic dogs vomit, press their head against walls, or some that have rapid mouth movements called chewing gum fits.

Dr. Welton :

While the most common presentation of seizures is convulsive activity, episodes of catatonia like your dog is exhibiting, leaves me suspicious for atypical epilepsy.

Dr. Welton :

Other considerations for episodal catonia are metabolic disturbances, such as hypothyroidism, diabetes, or addisons disease.

Dr. Welton :

Thus, I would advise a veterinary visit at your earliest convenience for a through examination and blood work. If metabolic disturbances are ruled out, then epilepsy can be addressed...it typically responds well to maintenance on phenobarbitol.

Dr. Welton :

Not seeing any feedback on my answers. If there anything else I may do for you today? Anything you would like me to clarify?

Customer:

thank you so much i had a feeling it could be epilepsy i will contact my vet asap. Thank you so much for your time

Dr. Welton :

It was my pleasure. Best wishes to you and Lucy! :-)

Customer:

thank you :-)

Dr. Welton :

We are happy to help.

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