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Dr. Drew
Dr. Drew, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 16846
Experience:  Small Animal Medicine and Surgery
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My dog has pacerdial effusion amd had his heart drained. Will

Resolved Question:

My dog has pacerdial effusion amd had his heart drained. Will his stomach go down on its own?
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Dr. Drew replied 2 years ago.
Dr. Drew :

, thanks question today! I am Dr. Drew, and I am a licensed veterinarian. I'll be happy to help you in any way I can.

Dr. Drew :

With Pericardial Effusion,

Dr. Drew :

fluid builds up in the sac around the heart.

Dr. Drew :

draining this fluid, allows the heart to function better, which may in fact allow the fluid built up in the abdomen to be reduced,

Dr. Drew :

but in some cases it too must be drained just like the pericardial fluid.

Dr. Drew :

Also, it is important to realize that many cases of pericardial effusion are unfortunately caused by cancer,

Dr. Drew :

and swelling of the abdomen can also be caused by cancer.

Dr. Drew :

so x-rays and ultrasound of the abdomen would be strongly recommended, if not already done.

Dr. Drew :

If you need further clarification when you return, just let me know.

Customer:

thanks alot he has had all his scans and xrays they say hes ok but needs his abdomen drained but it seems to be going down itself. How would they do this and is it dangerous? Thanks in advance.

Dr. Drew :

I'm glad to hear that no evidence of cancer was found.

Dr. Drew :

The process to drain the abdomen is similar to that used to drain the pericardial sac,

Dr. Drew :

but it's less risky,

Dr. Drew :

typically mild sedation is all that's needed,

Dr. Drew :

though in some patients it can be done without the need sedative.

Dr. Drew :

typically a small tube is inserted near the umbilicus (navel) area,

Dr. Drew :

and the fluid is drawn out with a syringe.

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