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Jane Lefler
Jane Lefler, Animal Behaviorist
Category: Dog Training
Satisfied Customers: 19099
Experience:  Dog breeder/Trainer and Behaviorist 18+ years
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My rescued dog is very unhappy about being tethered if I am

Customer Question

My rescued dog is very unhappy about being tethered if I am out of sight. She also hates being caged even with my other dog if I leave her for more than a few minutes.
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Dog Training
Expert:  Jane Lefler replied 2 years ago.
Customer
.
My name is Jane. I have been working professionally with animals especially dogs in both health and behavioral issues for over 18 years. I have over 14,000 satisfied customers. It will be my pleasure to work with you today.
.
In order to supply you with the best information, I do need to ask for some additional information. Once I receive your answer, it will likely take me about 30-45 minutes to type up your response. I hope you can be patient.
.
Do you need to have her tethered?
Does the tether have a swivel to prevent the line from kinking up? Are you sure there is no items the tether might get caught on?
What type of crate were you using?
Is her escaping the crate the main issue?
If we can stop that, would that be a solution for your issue?
Does she need to go to your daughters and stay for a specific reason or is it just a desired trip?
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

The crate is a large normal dog crate. After she got out of the crate my daughter walked her and let her run around in her field before tying her up until I returned. She bites through normal tethers so had to use a chain lead. She needs to go to my daughter's when I have to go to things like funerals that are about 1 and a half hours travel away. If I have to be away for more than 4 or 5 hours. It does not happen very often but I need to leave her then. I have a large shed and run in my garden with a trellis fence. I left her out there with my other dog for about 3 hours and she chewed her way out through the wooden gate.

Expert:  Jane Lefler replied 2 years ago.
Angela,
.
Thanks for the additional information. It is helpful. There are many options for you. The first would be to get an escape proof crate. They are constructed of square aluminum bars rather than the thin wire bars and are considered escape proof. They are a little expensive but are worth the peace of mind. See one model here. There are less expensive ones.
https://www.petedge.com/zpetedgemain/catalog/productDetail.jsf?wec-appid=PEDM_WEBSHOP_TR&itemKey=005056A633791ED2B59175292C3C6FB3
This solves the problem. The second thing that can be done is to reinforce your wood fencing with field fencing. It could easily be attached to the inside of your existing fence to keep him from chewing his way out of the yard. An electric fence system would serve the same purpose. They can be found on auction sites pretty cheaply. That would allow him to be outside when you are gone.
If you do use a chain lead to tether him, be sure it has the swivels where it is attached to his collar and where it attaches to the pole, tree, etc to prevent the chain from kinking and eventually strangling your dog. Rope does the same thing, so swivels are very important if tethering a dog.
The other thing that might help is a DAP collar. They use pheromones to calm a dog and are great for separation anxiety. They can be purchased at pet stores. You might also start working on him with crating but that might not be as effective as an escape proof crate.
Practice putting him in the crate, leaving the house, opening the door immediately and rewarding him with a hot dog treat if he did not scratch, bite and carry one. This teaches him that you leave but come back quickly. Once he seems to not do anything when you initially leave, lengthen the time he must be quet for you to come back in. Change the time as well. Make it 2 minutes one time and 10 mintues another, so he never knows if you are gone for an hour or gone foe 2 minutes. It helps him stay calm for longer periods of time, just be sure you reward him when he is good.
Another thing that helps is to do things that might make the dog feel you are leaving and then don't such as putting on your coat or picking up your keys. Or leave without doing those things. This helps remove things that might trigger the dog to become anxious.
I hope this information is helpful to you and you are satisfied with my response. If you would like any additional information or have more questions please don’t hesitate to press the reply to expert or continue conversation button so I can address any issues you still have .
.
Jane Lefler, Animal Behaviorist
Category: Dog Training
Satisfied Customers: 19099
Experience: Dog breeder/Trainer and Behaviorist 18+ years
Jane Lefler and other Dog Training Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

I needed to know how to train my dog not to be so anxious not to prevent her getting out of the crate. I have helped her when she is at my home but it does not work when she is away from me.

Expert:  Jane Lefler replied 2 years ago.


Athe following things are the suggestions that will help deal with what is called separation anxiety. The crate, swivel and other things was more to protect your dog and prevent him from escaping.


The other thing that might help is a DAP collar. They use pheromones to calm a dog and are great for separation anxiety. They can be purchased at pet stores. You might also start working on him with crating but that might not be as effective as an escape proof crate.

Practice putting him in the crate, leaving the house, opening the door immediately and rewarding him with a hot dog treat if he did not scratch, bite and carry one. This teaches him that you leave but come back quickly. Once he seems to not do anything when you initially leave, lengthen the time he must be quet for you to come back in. Change the time as well. Make it 2 minutes one time and 10 mintues another, so he never knows if you are gone for an hour or gone foe 2 minutes. It helps him stay calm for longer periods of time, just be sure you reward him when he is good.

Another thing that helps is to do things that might make the dog feel you are leaving and then don't such as putting on your coat or picking up your keys. Or leave without doing those things. This helps remove things that might trigger the dog to become anxious.

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