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Jane Lefler
Jane Lefler, Animal Behaviorist
Category: Dog Training
Satisfied Customers: 19828
Experience:  Dog breeder/Trainer and Behaviorist 18+ years
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It is regarding my 1 year old terrier, Over the last few

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hi there it is regarding my 1 year old ***** ***** terrier, Over the last few weeks he has become very aggressive for no reason. He bites and he has bitten my husband and myself to the extent that we were actually bleeding. He will also not sleep in his crate at night. This has been going on bow for the last few months with the result i have to sleep downstairs with him because it not he just barks all night and the neighbours are complaining about the barking at night. We are going away at the end of September for the weekend and I want to put him in kennels but cant because of him being aggressive. I would be grateful for your advice,
Assistant: Thank you. Can you provide any more details to help us find you the right Expert?
Customer: Winston likes to play and will bite you which is not hurtful but then he becomes aggressive for no reason and just bites. I just don't know what to do now.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Dog Training
Expert:  Jane Lefler replied 1 year ago.

Hi JaCustomer,

My name is ***** ***** I’ve been involved professionally with dogs in the health and behavioral fields for over 18 years. It will be my pleasure to work with you today.

In order to supply you with an informed answer, it is necessary for me to collect some additional information from you. When I receive your response or reply, it will likely take me between 30-45 minutes to type up my reply if I am still online when I receive notice that you replied. I hope you can be patient.

Is Winston neutered?

What obedience training has Winston had?

How many neighbors are affected by the barking and are they generally good neighbors?

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
he is neutered. He has not had any obedience training. 2 neighbours have complained so far. I don't know them that well.
Expert:  Jane Lefler replied 1 year ago.

Thanks for the additional information. It is helpful.

Dogs are pack animals and in each pack or family unit there is a top dog. Young dogs acknowledge all adult people and dogs as the boss. When they get older between 7 to 18 months of age, they test their boundaries. It might start with ignoring commands and progress getting on furniture if they are not allowed on it or taking your items or even urinating around the home. then it progresses to growling if you want them to do something they don't want to do and eventually to them reprimanding you if you do something they no longer want to do or insist that they do something like move. Reprimands do include nips and full on bites if you ignore their growls.

There are medical causes for sudden aggression as well which you can read about on the following pages but to me it sounds more behavioral than medical especially when coupled with the barking issue.

http://www.petplace.com/dogs/medical-causes-of-aggression-in-dogs/page1.aspx

http://www.tropicaldogtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Dodman_MA10.pdf

http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.michvma.org/resource/resmgr/MVC_Proceedings_2015/horwitz_02.pdf

Dogs that are allowed on furniture (even if put on the furniture) tend to feel that since they are elevated to your level or higher if on your lap, they mentally feel elevated as well in the pack order and thus are the boss. Keeping them on the floor can help lower them mentally back to a submissive position in the pack. So the first thing is to not allow him higher that the humans or even on the same level. In addition, humans shouldn't be on the floor with him either. A small short stool is enough to keep them higher than the dog when petting the dog. Attach a leash and use it to remove him from the furniture. Give a correction in the form of a quick tug and firm "NO" when he attempts to get on and a treat when he starts not trying to get on the furniture. Thus you are providing negative reinforcement for the getting on the furniture and positive reinforcement for the desired behavior (not attempting to get on the furniture).

There are other ways to regain the dominant position in the house as well. The best way is to start obedience training. While a formal training class is great, you can start obedience training without a formal class. The following site is helpful in helping owners train their dog. Be sure and click on the link to the page on obedience at the bottom. and links on subsequent pages leading to detailed instructions.

http://www.schutzhund-training.com/training_theory.html

Training works best if you train at least 30 minutes a day (two 15 minute sessions). I would start making your dog work via the Nothing in life is free program (NILF). It is outlined below.

http://www.pets.ca/articles/article-dog_nilf.htm

http://www.cairnrescue.com/docs/NILIF.pdf

You will also want to keep a leash on him at all times initially to grab if he should disobey. I think you will be pleasantly surprised at how well your dog does with training. Dogs like knowing what is expected of them and they love the little paper thin slices of hotdogs that I use for treats while training. Give this a try and see how it works for you.

Additionally, I would suggest you get a basket muzzle and make him wear it anytime children are around or visitors are there. Be sure to use the leash to make him obey you. If he growls give a short tug to get his attention and a firm "NO" to let him know, you are not going to allow his aggression. If he is sleeping, give a little tug to let him know that someone is there so he isn't startled when being woken up. .

In addition, if the situation is not improving using the techniques on the previous website, you may have to consult a professional behaviorist. You can usually find a behaviorist by asking your Vet for a recommendation or you may be able to find one using the following site.

http://www.apdt.com

You have a couple of options for the barking. Dogs learn real quick how to manipulate their owners. He has learned that if he barks, you come downstairs and stay with him. When you come down, he gets what he wants which is to be with you. Now you can move his crate into your bedroom which should solve that problem. You might also not crate him at night if he is already house trained.

The other option is to buy some cheap earplugs for your family and your neighbors and explain to them that you need to train the dog and will be starting friday night so as to hopefully not disturb too many people with his barking during training and offer them the ear plugs. You need to ignore the barking. You can't yell at him, acknowledge him or get up. He needs to realize that his barking is not going to get you to come join him. Now initially he will just bark longer because in the past if you didn't respond and he kept on barking you eventually would cave in and go to him. You absolutely can not respond to him. When he stops barking is when you go to him.

I recommend crating and going to your bedroom during the day and not responding to him until he stops barking. when he does stop barking then go to him, give him calm praise and a tasty treat like a hot dog sliver. This teaches him that barking gets him nothing and not barking gets him treats and attention from you. If you absolutely need the barking to stop immediately, then a bark collar either citronella spray or shock collar would be the best choice. They are very effective at stopping barking. I do NOT recommend ultrasonic bark collars as a dog learns quickly to ignore the ultrasonic tone used to distract the dog.

I hope this information is helpful to you. If you would like any additional information or have more questions please don’t hesitate to press the reply to expert or continue conversation button so I can address any issues you still have . If you do find this helpful, please take this opportunity to rate my answer positively so I am compensated for my time.

Jane Lefler and other Dog Training Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi there thanks for that. It is only at night that he barks. He is fine during the day in his crate.