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Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 45351
Experience:  Qualified Employment Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
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I am currently a global grade 12 and earn 53k, yesterday was

Customer Question

good morning
I am currently a global grade 12 and earn 53k , yesterday was the start of a 45 day consultation for the business transformation . I was offered a role with my salary staying the same but my global grade dropping to 10
this as you know changes the salary band from what was £30,660 -56,298 down to £24,045 - 41,777 this means I will never be entitled to a pay rise ever again
I have been a contracts manager for over 10 years and now this new role that has been offered to me is a much lesser role
can you advise on where I stand with this please
Submitted: 6 months ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

Hello, my name is***** am a qualified lawyer and it is my pleasure to assist you with your question today.

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
Thank you
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

Based on what you have described, what would be the ideal outcome for you so that I can look at your options?

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
My global.grade needs to be back to 12 or even better I am made redundant as I have 17 years service at 2 weeks per year
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

OK thank you, ***** ***** it with me. I am in court for the day and will be travelling until late so I won't be able to reply until the morning. However, I will prepare my advice during this time and will get back to you at the earliest opportunity. There is no need to wait here as you will receive an email when I have responded. Thank you.

Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

Thanks for your patience. This is essentially a change to your contracted terms and conditions. There are a few ways in which an employer may try and make changes to an employee’s contract of employment. These are by:

· Receiving the employee’s express consent to the changes.

· Forcefully introducing the changes (called 'unilateral change of contract').

· Giving the employee notice to terminate their current contract and then offer them immediate re-engagement under a new contract that contains the new terms.

If the changes are introduced without the employee's consent, then the following options are available:

1. Start working on the new terms but making it clear in writing that you are working ‘under protest’. This means that you do not agree with the changes but feel forced to do so. In the meantime you should try and resolve the issue either by informal discussions or by raising a formal grievance.

2. If the changes fundamentally impact the contract, for example changes to pay, duties, place of work, etc., you may wish to consider resigning and claiming constructive dismissal. The resignation must be done without unreasonable delay so as not to give the impression that the changes had been accepted. The claim must be submitted in an employment tribunal within 3 months of resigning and is subject to you having at least 2 years' continuous service. You would then seek compensation for loss of earnings resulting from the employer's actions.

3. If the employment is terminated and the employer offers re-engagement on the new terms that could potentially amount to unfair dismissal. However, the employer can try and justify the dismissal and the changes if they had a sound business reason for doing so. This could be pressing business needs requiring drastic changes for the company to survive. If no such reason exists, you can make a claim for unfair dismissal in an employment tribunal. The same time limit of 3 months to claim and the requirement to have 2 years' continuous would apply.

Finally, it is also worth mentioning that sometimes employment contracts may try to give the employer a general right to make changes to an employee’s contract. As such clauses give the employer the unreserved to change any term, so as to evade the general rule that changes must be mutually agreed, courts will rarely enforce such clauses. Nothing but the clearest language will be sufficient to create such a right and the situation must warrant it. Any attempt to rely on such clauses will still be subject to the requirement of the employer to act reasonably and can be challenged as above.

This is your basic legal position. I have more detailed advice for you in terms of the law on constructive dismissal and how it can apply here, which I wish to discuss so please take a second to leave a positive rating for the service so far (by selecting 3, 4 or 5 stars) and I can continue with that and answer any further questions you may have. Don’t worry, there is no extra cost and leaving a rating will not close the question and we can continue this discussion. Thank you

Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 45351
Experience: Qualified Employment Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
Ben Jones and other Employment Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 6 months ago.
I think I sit in number 2
Although they are not touching my salary
They are preventing me from getting any future pay rises due to dropping me 2 global grade places
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

Thank you. So as mentioned in this case it could amount to constructive dismissal, which occurs when the following two elements are present:

· Serious breach of contract by the employer; and

· An acceptance of that breach by the employee, who in turn treats the contract of employment as at an end. The employee must act in response to the breach and must not delay any action too long.

A common breach by the employer occurs when it, or its employees, have broken the implied contractual term of trust and confidence. The conduct relied on could be a single act, or a series of less serious acts over a period of time, which together could be treated as serious enough (usually culminating in the 'last straw' scenario).

The affected employee would initially be expected to raise a formal grievance in order to officially bring their concerns to the employer's attention and give them an opportunity to try and resolve them. If the issues are so bad that the employee can't even face raising a grievance and going through the process, or if a grievance has been raised but has been unsuccessful, then they can consider resigning straight away.

If resignation appears to be the only option, it must be done without unreasonable delay so as not to give an impression that the employer's breach had been accepted. Any resignation would normally be with immediate effect and without providing any notice period. It is advisable to resign in writing, stating the reasons for the resignation and that this is being treated as constructive dismissal.

Following the resignation, the option of pursuing a claim for constructive dismissal exists. This is only available to employees who have at least 2 years' continuous service. There is a time limit of 3 months from the date of resignation to submit a claim in the employment tribunal.

An alternative way out is to approach the employer on a 'without prejudice' basis (i.e. off the record) to try and discuss the possibility of leaving under a settlement agreement. Under a settlement agreement, the employee gets compensated for leaving the company and in return promises not to make any claims against the employer in the future. It is essentially a clean break, although the employer does not have to agree to it so it will be subject to negotiation. In any event, there is nothing to lose by raising this possibility with them because you cannot be treated detrimentally for suggesting it and it would not be used against you.

Just to make a final, yet important point, that constructive dismissal can be a difficult claim to win as the burden of proof is entirely on the employee to show the required elements of a claim were present. Therefore, it should only be used as a last resort.

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
Can you give me more on my situation please?
My role has been significantly reduced in my new role description even though my salary is not being touched when I raised my concerns I was told that I will be doing exactly the same role as before and I am still being paid the same salary so I asked then why is the role description stating otherwise and why has my Glol Grade dropped
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

So what is the overall effect f this change then, if your pay is staying the same, is the only effect the fact you may not get a pay rise?

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
the role has gone from managing as operations manager 40+ staff to operational lead mechanical which is a glorified supervisor with 5 direct reports and now on the same or chart line as the supervisors that reported to me before
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 6 months ago.

Just because the salary is the same does not mean that there is no breach and they can continue keeping you in this role without you being able to challenge it. There are many other factors which can amount to a significant change to terms and conditions, such as change in status and adverse effect on future opportunities, like promotion, pay, etc. So these are still factors that can be used to argue that there has been a fundamental breach of contract, forcing you to go down the constructive dismissal route if necessary.

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