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Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 47887
Experience:  Qualified Employment Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
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An employer has given his notice verbally 2 weeks ago but

Customer Question

An employer has given his notice verbally 2 weeks ago but now has said he wants to stay . With the company quite small we had to find someone to replace him with we did and he started today to be trained up before the other Person left . I'm I write in saying you can give notice verbally .
Thankyo
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 1 year ago.

Hello, my name is***** am a qualified lawyer and I will be assisting you with your question today.

Expert:  Ben Jones replied 1 year ago.

Does the employee have a notice period? If so, please can you tell me what it is?

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
1month
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 1 year ago.

OK thank you, ***** ***** it with me. I am in court today so will prepare my advice during the day and get back to you at the earliest opportunity. There is no need to wait here as you will receive an email when I have responded. Thank you.

Expert:  Ben Jones replied 1 year ago.

Many thanks for your patience. It is entirely possible for notice to be given verbally and for it to be legally binding. A resignation can therefore be verbal and be accepted by the employer who in turn relies on it to plan ahead. One point of consideration is if the contract had specifically stated that resignation must be given in writing – then the employee may try and argue that they had not given valid resignation as per contract, although you can counter-argue that you had waived the requirement to resign in writing by accepting their resignation regardless of how it was given, so overall it would be difficult for the employee to try and get their job back in the circumstances.

I hope this has answered your query. I would be grateful if you could please take a second to leave a positive rating (3, 4 or 5 stars) as that is an important part of our process and recognises the time I have spent assisting you. If you need me to clarify anything before you go - please get back to me on here and I will assist further as best as I can. Thank you

Expert:  Ben Jones replied 1 year ago.

My full response should be visible on this page. Could you please let me know if it has answered your original question or whether you need me to clarify anything else in relation to this? If your query has been answered I would be grateful if you could please take a second to leave a positive rating, selecting 3, 4 or 5 starts at the top of the page. Thank you

Expert:  Ben Jones replied 12 months ago.

Hello, do you need any further assistance or are you happy with the above response? Look forward to hearing from you.