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Clare
Clare, Family Solicitor
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 34259
Experience:  I have been a solicitor in High Street Practise since 1985 and have specialised in Family Law for the last 10 years
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Hello, At what age do children have the right to defy a

Resolved Question:

Hello,
At what age do children have the right to defy a court order. My children are 16,13 and 10 and spend 6 nights out of 14 with their father. However he is sometimes abusive unnecessarily to me in front of them and I know they find this very upsetting and it leads to them fighting with him. They also complain a lot about his 'unreasonableness'. My eldest is in his GCSE year and I am worried that it will affect his ability to concentrate on his work. More and more I hear them arguing on the phone and reports of their dad not being supportive. I wonder what advice to give them at their respective ages as to how to cope with it all.
Thank you for your help with this matter,
Joanna
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  Clare replied 3 years ago.
Hi
Thank you for your question.
My name is ***** ***** I will do my best to help you
The Court order no longer covers your 16 year old who is free to share his time between his parents as he wishes
So far as the younger children are concerned your 13 year old is of the age where his or her wishes are seen as being of great importance - and if the matter goes back to court it is likely that the new pattern of contact would reflect what the 13 year old wishes - provided it is reasonable and safe.
At 10 your youngest is too young for his or her wishes to be the deciding factor.
I hope that this is of assistance - please ask if you need further details
Clare
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