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Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 47340
Experience:  Qualified Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
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We have an outstanding invoice with a supplier. However they

Customer Question

We have an outstanding invoice with a supplier. However they have now contacted a third party (our building owners) and advised them of our details. Surely this is illegal

Angie
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 3 years ago.

Ben Jones :

Hello, my name is Ben and it is my pleasure to assist you with your question today. What have they said about you to them?

JACUSTOMER-t01twwi7- :

They have forwarded the outstanding invoice and requested payment

Ben Jones : So are there any private details in the documents they sent to them that the building owners were not aware of?
JACUSTOMER-t01twwi7- :

Apart from the fact that we owe monies no. However the point is that no person should advise a third party of our business dealings which they have noting to do with. Also as the third party is our landlord is can become very embarassing not to mention awkward.

Ben Jones :

I agree that doing this can be upsetting and that it is morally wrong, but it is not unlawful. The supplier will be restricted from supplying information to third parties only on a handful of occasions – if there was a contractual policy or restriction on what they can disclose, for example if you have agreed specifically that certain information must remain confidential; if they are disclosing personal data about individuals; or if they defamed you by providing untruthful information about you. As this will not amount to personal data, and neither does it appear to be an untruthful claim, you are only really looking at the contractual restrictions that may exist and that may have been broken. Unless such restrictions exist and have been broken through their actions, what they did will not be unlawful, even if it would generally be considered morally wrong. However, morals and the law are to separate issues and you can only take action for things that are unlawful.

Ben Jones :

Please let me know if this has answered your original question or if you need me to clarify anything else for you in relation to this?

Ben Jones :

I see you have accessed and read my answer to your query. Please let me know if this has answered your original question or if you need me to clarify anything else for you in relation to this?