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Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 48160
Experience:  Qualified Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
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I work full time. 2 days at a local office 3 days in london

Resolved Question:

I work full time. 2 days at a local office 3 days in london our head office . They are closing the local office and have said that I can work from home for those two days. I believe if one of my directors has her way they will say I will have to work all 5 days in london. I am due to start my state pension on the 6th July. Can I phase my retirement and ask to go down to 4 days and if they change their mind about working from home can I then say I want to go down to 3 days. Thank you Gill Williams
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 3 years ago.

Ben Jones :

Hello, my name is XXXXX XXXXX it is my pleasure to assist you with your question today.

Ben Jones :

How long have you worked there for?

Customer:

I have worked there 3 years 5 months

Ben Jones :

OK, thank you, XXXXX XXXXX this with me - I will look into this for you, get my response ready and get back to you on here. No need to wait around and you will get an email when I have responded, thank you

Ben Jones :

Many thanks for your patience. Your rights will largely depend on what your contract says about your place of work and any potential relocation. So it is important to check whether there is any specific wording about your work location and what the employer can ask you to do, such as whether they can ask you to move office or work from a different location. If the contract allows that, then you would not necessarily be guaranteed to work from home.


 


There is nothing stopping you from asking the employer to allow you to reduce your hours/days of work – anyone can request that at any time but it is for the employer to decide whether it is possible and if the business needs would make that difficult or even impossible. So you have nothing to lose by asking the employer to consider allowing a reduction on wring days.


 


However, if your request is rejected and your contract allows the employer to move you to other offices or you had no nominated place of work in there, then forcing through a reduction may be somewhat difficult. Perhaps you could let me know what your contract says about this and then I can discuss what your rights are likely to be…

Customer:

My contract says I can be asked to work anywhere in london area. I thought I could tell my employer that I wanted to reduce my hours once I had reached retirement age and they could not refuse.

Expert:  Ben Jones replied 3 years ago.
Hi, no I am afraid there is no law that says your employer MUST give you reduced hours if you asked for them, even if you have reached state pension age. You are still able to make a formal flexible working request but that would be treated the same way as any other similar request and the employer only has to grant it if the business needs allow it. What they can't do is treat you detrimentally because of your age, so for example if someone doing the same or similar job as you asks for flexible working and their request is granted, the employer cannot refuse to grant your request simply because you are the one that is older or the one that has reached retirement age. However, in the absence of such reasons for their decision, they will be able to decide whether it is possible to grant you flexible working hours or not.

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Expert:  Ben Jones replied 3 years ago.
Hello, I see you have accessed and read my answer to your query. Please let me know if this has answered your original question or if you need me to clarify anything else for you in relation to this? I just need to know whether to close the question or not? Thanks