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UKSolicitorJA
UKSolicitorJA, Solicitor
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 4312
Experience:  English solicitor with over 12 years experience
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We are currently in the process of selling our house and are

Resolved Question:

We are currently in the process of selling our house and are waiting to exchange after a number of delays.

When we completed the proforma advice form re whether there were likely to be any developments affecting the property we advised that we were not aware of any. Now after 6 months since the forms were completed, we have learnt that there are proposals to build 250 houses on the land behind us. No planning application has been made but the developers have advised the parish council and they called a meeting to discuss the proposals. Are we required by law to advise the potential buyers of the new developments , even though this could be 2/ 3 years down the line etc
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  UKSolicitorJA replied 3 years ago.
If the form was proforma advice and a final one is required, then you should disclose the information pertaining to the proposed developments in the final one as pro forma by its very nature means it is subject to change, and in your case, there is change as you are now aware of the proposal to develop 250 houses on the neighbouring land.

Hope this helps
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Customer: replied 3 years ago.

if the form was the final form - we have not been requested to complete a further form - do you mean that we do not need ot say anything to our solicitor