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Jo C.
Jo C., Barrister
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 70649
Experience:  Over 5 years in practice
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Hi, these days, someone send an E-mail to my ex-boyfriend which

Customer Question

Hi, these days, someone send an E-mail to my ex-boyfriend which is my naked pictures with some words. My ex-exboyfriend had online video with me and those pictures are screenshot happened last November It's so odd that send it last week after almost one year. Is there any possible that I can find out who did this and sue him/her but I only know is the E-mail address of the sender. I asked my ex-boyfriend don't reply that E-mail. Please tell me what should I do now.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Jo C. replied 3 years ago.
Hi.
Thank you for your question. My name is ***** ***** I will try to help with this.
It depends upon the evidence chain. It is possible to send ghost emails that are almost completely untraceable. If it is a registered email address then that will be traceable.
You can seek an injunction forcing the hoster to tell you to whom it is registered. That is not a cheap option. They will not hand the information over without it because it would not comply with the DPA. That would probably cost in the region of the lower thousands.
When you have that information, of course, you would only have the identity of the person to whom the email address is registered which does not prove they were the sender. Proving the sender is much harder but at least that is a beginning.
In terms of what you could sue for, it rather depends on the identity of the sender. That will reveal how they came by the photographs. There may be a claim arising from that which will depend on their explanation.
You can also report it to the police as there are public order offences potentially. The practical reality is that they will make efforts to trace the registered person but if they deny the sending then it is not likely that the police would prosecute that person.
Can I clarify anything for you?
Jo
Jo C. and other Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Hi, thanks for your answer. This email could be traceable because it's registered email address. If I'd like to track the identity of the sender, should I need to inform the police?

Expert:  Jo C. replied 3 years ago.
You can't trace the sender. All you can do is trace the person to whom it is registered. That doesn't prove it was the sender.
You can inform the police. The practical reality is that they will make efforts to trace the registered person but if they deny the sending then it is not likely that the police would prosecute that person.
Usually people who do things like this hack into accounts registered to people who are innocent. They do not usually use their own email address.
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Yes, that's what I mean to trace the registered person first. Ok, I'll inform the police tomorrow. Smile

Expert:  Jo C. replied 3 years ago.
I would try that.
They may or may not become involved but it is free to do that so it is worth it first.
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Hi, I forgot inform one thing to you. This email send it from another country, UK police won't get involved, doesn't they?

Expert:  Jo C. replied 3 years ago.
They may not.
In fact, since the email was received in the UK they do have jurisdiction because some of any offence was committed here which is all they need but it will cause practical difficulties in making an arrest.
Similarly though, from your point of view, unless the hoster is willing to tell you who the registered person is there is no point in seeking an injunction as it will be prohibitively expensive to sue.