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Clare
Clare, Solicitor
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 34581
Experience:  I have been a solicitor in High Street Practice since 1985 with a wide general experience.
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Dear Sirs My query relates to Child Support Agency (CSA)

Resolved Question:

Dear Sirs
My query relates to Child Support Agency (CSA) Legislation and specifically whether or not the Legislation permits the Agency to consider “Willful Deprivation of Assets” and if so, then consequences of this.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Clare replied 3 years ago.
Hi
Thank you for your question.
My name is Clare
I will do my best to help you but I need some further information first.
Which scheme is being asked about 1993, 2003 or 2012?
Clare
Customer: replied 3 years ago.
Hi
My involvement with the CSA started in 2007/2008 and it's still very much on going, payments have always been asset based not income.
Expert:  Clare replied 3 years ago.
Hi
Thank you so it is the 2003 system
I assume that you have assets (other than your home) in excess of £65,000 - is that correct?
Clare
Customer: replied 3 years ago.
Yes Clare, that is correct but I no longer have these assets.
Expert:  Clare replied 3 years ago.
Hi
Can you account for what happened to them?
Clare
Customer: replied 3 years ago.
Sorry to be evasive Clare but the question is, can the CSA consider "wilful depravation"? I have transferred my assets to my son, I do not want to have the transactions overturned/reversed.
Expert:  Clare replied 3 years ago.
Hi
The CSA cannot overturn it - they can simply assess you on the basis that the assets are still available to you
However provided the assets have genuinely passed from your care and control and that your son is entitled to dispose of them in any way he wishes (and that he is over 18) then you shoudl be able to successfully fight this.
After all if you had but it all on a horse (or a number of horses) they could not have done anything.
The key will be that you no longer have any access or interest or involvement in the asset
I hope that this is of assistance - please ask if you need further details
Clare
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