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Aston Lawyer
Aston Lawyer, Solicitor
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 10490
Experience:  Solicitor LLB (Hons) 23 years of experience in Conveyancing and Property Law
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am living with partner who own all of property and will be

Customer Question

am living with partner who own all of property and will be left to children what are my limitations upon her prior demise
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Aston Lawyer replied 2 years ago.

Hello and thanks for using Just Answer.

My name is ***** ***** am happy to assist you with your enquiry.

Have you discussed matters with your partner?

Are you financially dependent on her?

Kind Regards

AL

Customer: replied 2 years ago.

give me the law the law only i talk the my partner give me the law

Expert:  Aston Lawyer replied 2 years ago.

Hi,

The general law is as follows;-

Whether or not a deceased left a will, certain family members and dependants may apply to court for reasonable financial provision from the estate, under the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975 ("the 1975 Act"). This is often referred to as a claim for family provision.

The intestacy rules must strive to reflect the needs and expectations of modern families. Where the rules (or the deceased's will) fail to make adequate provision for close family members or dependants, a claim can be made by the partner/family member under the Act.

Although I don't know the circumstances of your case, if you have no means to rehouse yourself in the event of your partner dying first, it would be reasonable for her to have granted you a right to remain living in her proeprty for the rest of your life. If she does not, you would need to take advice at that time with a view to making a claim under the Act.

I hope this assists you and answers your question.

Kind Regards

AL

Expert:  Aston Lawyer replied 2 years ago.

Hi Gunther,

Can I be of any more help to you?

Kind Regards

AL