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LondonlawyerJ
LondonlawyerJ, Advocate
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 803
Experience:  Solicitor with over 15 years experience.
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We have done some work to a drive and the customer is unhappy

Customer Question

We have done some work to a drive and the customer is unhappy and will not pay, the job done is correct are we within our rights to take the drive back up please
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  LondonlawyerJ replied 2 years ago.
Customer:

Hello I am a solicitor with 20 years experience. I will try to help you with this.

Customer:

No yo can not do this unless the customer is saying he wants you to take it away. You would be at risk of being prosecuted for criminal damage if you did this. You would also haveto trespass on his land to do it.

Customer:

How much does he owe you?

Customer:

If it is less than £10,oo then you can start a claim in the small claims court for the outstanding money. You should first send a letter explaining what he asked you to do , what you did, the price agreed and that you have asked for payment following completion of the work which he has refused with no good reason to do so. You should give him 14 or 21 days to pay the outstanding amount and warn him that if he doesn't then you will take him to court to seek recovery of the money.

Customer:

Follow this ink for the government website on how to make a money claim. https://www.gov.uk/make-court-claim-for-money/overview

Customer:

The small claims court is designed to be simple to use and to avoid the use of lawyers with all their associate costs.

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