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LondonlawyerJ
LondonlawyerJ, Advocate
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 813
Experience:  Solicitor with over 15 years experience.
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A friend of mine was recently convicted of theft and sentenced at a Crown court to seven y

Resolved Question:

A friend of mine was recently convicted of theft and sentenced at a Crown court to seven years in prison. He inherited some money from his mother's estate, which he was going to use to pay back some money he borrowed from me.
Now he's saying that they're trying to bring a Proceeds of Crime against him and aim to seize the money his mother left him.
Please can you tell me if this is possible? I tried searching information on the internet, but - not having any legal background myself - I didn't get very far!
Thank you very much.
-Naka
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  LondonlawyerJ replied 2 years ago.
LondonlawyerJ :

, I am a solicitor woth 20 yeasr experience. I will try to he help you with this.

LondonlawyerJ :

7 years is a long sentence so I guess that the amount stolen was high. The short answer to your question is yes they can do this although the law is quite complicated.

Customer:

I was afraid of that. Yes, it was about £2.6m. Is it a sure thing once they've decided? I mean, could he appeal against it? (Sorry if it's a stupid question, but as I said, I know nothing about this)!

LondonlawyerJ :

There is a court process where the Crown have to establish various things and your friend can respond. After this there will be a court hearing to decide. He will almost certainly be doing this with the help of his solicitors at trial, unless they no longer have a good relationship folwling his conviction. If you want to foind out what is going on you should get your friend to write to her solicitor giving them permission to talk to you about this issue. They can not do so without his permission. The confiscation hearing will be in public and you can attend and listen if you like.

Customer:

Ah, I see. Attending would be a little difficult since I recently moved to Japan; would it be reported in the papers like a normal case?

Customer:

Or if not, would there be any other way to find out what was said? Is a confiscation hearing similar to a trial in that respect?

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