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Jo C.
Jo C., Barrister
Category: Law
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Experience:  Over 5 years in practice
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My son has been sentenced to 15 years and the police won't

Resolved Question:

My son has been sentenced to 15 years and the police won't give back the stuff they confiscated as evidence until he is released incase he appeals. So his father's brand new computer that cost over £3000 that they rook he can't have back for over 15 years.
Come on this is ridiculous. They have already had for over a year. This can't be right.I personally think someone has kept this mac computer fir themselves.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Jo C. replied 1 year ago.
What would you like to know about this please?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Are the police allowed to keep all the items they confiscated when my son was first arrested? Most of the items belong to my son's father. The police printed out everything they needed from the computer for the trial. It was only 3 months old. They got what they wanted and put my son away and he was made out to be a monster despite anyone being seriously hurt. I think the police are just being awkward because I said I am not going to rest until I prove that they did not conduct a thorough investigation and were biased from day one.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 1 year ago.
Were they used in the course of the trial?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Yes
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Perhaps in the week at an earlier time if that's okay? I commute to London for work and I have to be up for 0430. I probably will not make much sense right now as I am extremely tired.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 1 year ago.
In that case, they are entitled to do that I'm afraid.
The police can seize anything that is either unlawful per se or amounts to evidence or contains evidence. This falls into the latter category. They can only retain an evidential seizure for the length of time it takes for the prosecution but that does include the time period for an appeal.
Thereafter, it is possible to seek recovery. You need to prove it belongs to you or they will only return it to him unless he gives you written permission. It is fair to say that it is never really straight forward but it can be done.
Can I clarify anything for you?
Jo
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
The most expensive item is the Apple Mac that was onlly 3 months old when seized and worth over £3000. I am very suspicious. It definitely belongs to his father. He paid for it with instalments through his own bank account.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
He just finished paying for it last month.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 1 year ago.
He may have done but this is a criminal prosecution and it contains evidence.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Welll they should take the evidence out of the computer and give it back. Or give his father £3000.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 1 year ago.
I'm afraid they can't be forced to do either.Valuable things are seized by the police all the time if they contain evidence.
Jo C. and other Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
My son wants the computer to be analysed by an expert because he doesn't believe he made all the Internet searches the police claim. His defense team let him down in regard to the computer issue and other extremely important factors. I think the police have too much freedom to do what they want because often they abuse their power. They don't need the computer when they have everything printed that they need. I am having my son's Icloud account checked out to see if his computer has been used since he was sentenced. I don't trust this particular CID unit. My hunches always end up being right.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 1 year ago.
Does he dispute the offence?
I'm happy to continue with this but please rate my answer.

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