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Jamie-Law
Jamie-Law, Solicitor
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 5421
Experience:  Solicitor
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We are setting up an online training company and need a

Customer Question

We are setting up an online training company and need a legal disclaimer to say that any complaints etc about the content or advice given in the training will be dealt with in a uk court of law . Who can I ask and how much would this cost approximately ?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Jamie-Law replied 1 year ago.

Hello my name is ***** ***** I will help you.

So you won't consider any complaints except in court?

Jamie-Law and other Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
we would , it is more that we need to comply with our professional indemnity insurance , IF a court case was brought against us , we need ensure that participants have agreed that it would be in UK court . The online training will be global but we have set up a UK company & have PI insurance for this .
Expert:  Jamie-Law replied 1 year ago.

ok. I can draft such a clause. Let me get you an offer for that as an additional service.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Great , thank you
Expert:  Jamie-Law replied 1 year ago.

Thanks, ***** ***** will me and I will come back, probably later today if that is ok?

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thanks Jamie !
Expert:  Jamie-Law replied 1 year ago.

I have done it. It's quite a short clause so asked one of my colleagues to have a look and confirm it's ok.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok thank you!
Expert:  Jamie-Law replied 1 year ago.

Right its short and to the point:

This agreement is governed by the law of England and Wales. Both parties irrevocably submit to its exclusive jurisdiction. The parties also agree that the judicial jurisdiction shall be the Courts of England and Wales and any or all claims shall be heard therein.

That is the clause, short and to the point. But it means that the law of England and Wales (English and Welsh law is the same, but not Scotland). They also agree that any claims to be heard by the Courts of England and Wales.

Short, to the point but less room for interpretation. Is that ok?

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Jamie,Sounds great , thank you!
Expert:  Jamie-Law replied 1 year ago.

Happy to help!