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Jo C.
Jo C., Barrister
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 70194
Experience:  Over 5 years in practice
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Is a detainee allowed to have a shower and change of

Customer Question

Is a detainee allowed to have a shower and change of clothing whilst in custody
Submitted: 10 months ago.
Category: Law
Customer: replied 10 months ago.
Posted by JustAnswer at customer's request) Hello. I would like to request the following Expert Service(s) from you: Live Phone Call. Let me know if you need more information, or send me the service offer(s) so we can proceed.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 10 months ago.

Is this in police custody?

Customer: replied 10 months ago.
it is
Expert:  Jo C. replied 10 months ago.

There isn't a specific pace right that covers showering but they do usually allow detainees to wash. Most police stations don't have shower facilities though. A change of clothes might be accepted. They don't have to but they will. Can I Clairfy anything for you?

Expert:  Jo C. replied 10 months ago.

I'm sorry but I'm away at the moment so can't do calls but I could later tonight.

Customer: replied 10 months ago.
Ok understand you can't call so we will keep going by email.The police came round friday evening to pick up his medication. Strong painkillers as he has a back problem. Knowing he would be appearing before magistrates saturday (which I think is actually longer than the statutory 36 hours!!!) we offered fresh clothes to the police for him. They said no he would be alright.
When he turned up at 3.30 on saturday he was in a dreadful state. There must be some human rights minimum standard of care for someone...particularly as he was released without any charge.
His expartner keeps bringing these false accusations against him...is that not wasting police time as well as putting him through undeserved suffering.
Customer: replied 10 months ago.
I look forward to hearing from you....by this online conversation...I am having problems resetting password ***** email responses... ***@******.***I am concerned about Don as he has been subject to this vendetta for quite a while. we have only just moved in next to him this year and feel he is very vulnerable. He is on Gabapentin, which is dreadful stuff, so I think he needs some good advice. I fear that if it keeps on like this for much longer he is definitely a suicide risk.
Expert:  Jo C. replied 10 months ago.

As I've said they don't have to accept a change of clothes. Some people do use that type of opportunity to pass on unlawful items so some stations have a policy of not accepting anything.

Expert:  Jo C. replied 10 months ago.

Human rights do not extend to a change of clothes. There is a right to freedom from degrading treatment by I cannot agree this amounts to degrading treatment I'm afraid.

Jo C. and other Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 10 months ago.
I can understand police might think unlawful items could be passed on in that way but they are in a strong position to search anything given to them. He came back soaked in urine! Is that not degrading treatment? And he was put in front of the magistrate in that condition. As I note in one of my emails, he did not end up getting charged as he was not even in the vicinity when the alleged offence took place. Yet he was treated as though he was guilty...I thought we still believed here that someone is innocent until proved guilty. Thank you for your answer to my enquiry, I can see that you are telling me how things stand at the moment...I believe that I will need to pursue this issue as there should be some form of standard of care covering what happens to people in custody. I know the standards in relation to access to solicitor, being read one's rights etc, but there seem to be no clear giudelines relating to basic human dignity...I have certainly not been able to track any information down regarding that.
Thank you,
Customer: replied 10 months ago.
I don't think a phone call can add anything to what you have already said so I won't go ahead with that...I am expecting phone call from someone else shortly so will just go with the advice you have written Thank you
Expert:  Jo C. replied 10 months ago.

Ok. You can ask for a refund from the phone call?

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