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Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: Law
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I am currently an electronics design engineer for a company

Resolved Question:

I am currently an electronics design engineer for a company that has decided to no longer develop their own hardware products. I have not been told I'm being made redundant, but they intend to move me over to work in production to do menial assembly jobs instead. I think they must be trying to avoid redundancy payments. I am 61 years old, and would not be able to do the work (stiff joints etc). Are they entitled to do this? I thought they could only offer alternative jobs if they were a similar level. Thank you
Submitted: 9 months ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 9 months ago.

Hello, my name is***** am a qualified lawyer and I will be assisting you with your question today. How long have you worked there for?

Customer: replied 9 months ago.
8 years
Customer: replied 9 months ago.
I do not want to switch to phone.
Expert:  Ben Jones replied 9 months ago.

If there is a redundancy situation, which this would appear to be, an employer has a duty to offer those employees at risk any suitable alternative employment (“SAE”) that may exist at the time. The objective is to keep the employee in a job rather than make them redundant. Therefore, if an employee accepts an offer of SAE, their employment will continue in the new position and they would lose their entitlement to a redundancy payment.

If the offer is considered unsuitable and the employee refuses it, they will be made redundant and still receive redundancy pay. However, if the offer was suitable and the employee unreasonably refuses it, they would effectively be resigning and will lose their entitlement to redundancy pay.

So the main issue is what makes an offer suitable and when can an employee reasonably refuse it. The most common factors that would make an offer unsuitable are:

· Job content/status – drop in status, substantial changes in duties, etc.

· Pay and other benefits – significant drop in earnings/benefits (e.g. basic pay, bonuses, overtime, sick pay, holidays)

· Working hours – change in shift pattern, removal of overtime, extension/reduction of working hours

· Change of workplace – new location making it unreasonable to travel to the new place of work

· Job prospects – going from permanent to temporary work, becoming self-employed or being employed on a fixed-term contract.

Where an offer of alternative employment has been made and its terms and conditions are different to the employee's current terms, they have the right to a 4-week trial period. If during the trial period they decide that the job is not suitable they should tell their employer straight away. This will not affect their employment rights, including the right to receive statutory redundancy pay.

I would say you have a relatively strong position to reject what is currently on offer as being unsuitable and opt for redundancy instead.

Please take a second to leave a positive rating for the service so far by selecting 3, 4 or 5 stars. I can continue answering follow up questions and in particular can also discuss how to pursue this if they refuse to pay redundancy. Don’t worry, there is no extra cost and leaving a rating will not close the question and we can still continue this discussion. Thank you

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Expert:  Ben Jones replied 9 months ago.

A new feature in the employment tribunal’s claims process is mandatory early conciliation with ACAS. This requires prospective claimants to notify ACAS and provide details of their intended claim and they would then try to negotiate between the claimant and respondent to seek out of court settlement in order to avoid having to take the claim to the tribunal. It is possible for the parties to refuse to engage in these negotiations, or that they are unsuccessful, in which case they would get permission to proceed with making the claim in the tribunal.

If negotiations are initiated and settlement is reached, then the claimant would agree not to proceed with the claim in return for the agreed financial settlement.

The conciliation procedure and the form to fill in can be found here:

https://ec.acas.org.uk/Submission/SingleClaimantPage

In terms of the time limits within which a claim must be presented, the early conciliation process places a ‘stop’ on that and the time between notifying ACAS and them issuing permission to proceed with the claim would not count for the purposes of these time limits.