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Ask Clare Your Own Question
Clare
Clare, Solicitor
Category: Law
Satisfied Customers: 34479
Experience:  I have been a solicitor in High Street Practice since 1985 with a wide general experience.
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I jointly purchased a house in 1991 with my then current

Customer Question

I jointly purchased a house in 1991 with my then current boyfriend, we split soon after and he stayed in the house, my name remained on the mortgage which was paid off in Jan 2017. I've just learnt that this ex died recently and I want to know what my legal entitlement is to the property, I don't know if there was a will, or if he was married.
Submitted: 19 days ago.
Category: Law
Expert:  Clare replied 19 days ago.

Thank you for your question

My name is Clare

I shall do my best to help you but I need some further information first

Have you checked that your name is ***** ***** the deeds?

Customer: replied 19 days ago.
No, but I received a call from a private investigator today telling me of his death and that he has a letter from the solicitor for me dealing with his estate so i'm assuming that my name is ***** ***** deeds
Customer: replied 19 days ago.
Typed message is fine
Expert:  Clare replied 19 days ago.

Sorry about the site popups

If the property remains in joint names then you are going to receive at least 50% of it as a joint owner.

You may in fact receive all of the equity if the property is still held as "beneficial joint tenants" where the property automatically passes to the person who lives longest.

His Estate may be attempt to claim that credit needs to be given for any improvements to the property that has increased its value - and this may be an argument it would be worth negotiation on

I hope that this is of assistance - please ask if you need further details