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Daniel Sheibley, MD
Daniel Sheibley, MD, Doctor
Category: Medical
Satisfied Customers: 1834
Experience:  MD Grad Jefferson Medical College 2009. Internal Med intern 2010 & Radiology residency 2011. Husband & father of two.
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my left ovary hurts even after ovulation what could it be?

Resolved Question:

my left ovary hurts even after ovulation what could it be?
Submitted: 4 years ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  Daniel Sheibley, MD replied 4 years ago.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Have you had an ultrasound of the pelvis?

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Also, do your symptoms get worse with periods? and then persist but at a lower level after the period? And, how long has this been going on for?

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

If these are chronic symptoms you need to see your primary care doctor or gynecologist to be evaluated for the possibility of endometriosis (especially possible if your pain is somewhat cyclical). If this is has been only within one menstrual cycle, you need to be seen (ideally in the ER) to rule out an ectopic pregnancy(pregnancy outside the uterus within the pelvis (second best option is to be seen by your gynecologist), however obviously this possibility is dependent upon whether or not you are sexually active.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Acute pelvic pain can also be related to sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory conditions of the reproductive organs. If your pain is chronic or rapidly escalating you need to be seen in the ER for this to be ruled out.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Otherwise, an outpatient pelvic ultrasound ordered after a visit and examination by your primary care doctor or gynecologist would be the best place to start.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :
Customer:

yes

Customer:

not worse with period just a ovulation time

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

ok, are you on birth control pills?

Customer:

not long in happened in january though

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

are you on birth control pills?

Customer:

no birth control pills

Customer:

i want a baby

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

ok. are you sexually active?

Customer:

yes trying to concieve

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

ok. And you're currently experiencing pain?

Customer:

yes cramping

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Any discharge or bleeding from the vagina?

Customer:

no

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Ok. when was your last period?

Customer:

june 7, 2013

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Ok. Well in all seriousness and bases upon my specialization in radiology (we read ultrasounds, ct, mri, xray and thus are very familiar with all specialties of medicine as we tell the physician what the patient's problem is and what the next best imaging study is as well as know when patients need certain studies), you need to be seen emergently (in the Emergency department) to have a quantitative beta hcg pregnancy test and also a pelvic ultrasound to rule out an ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy outside the uterus but inside the pelvis) - this is potentially a fatal state as they are prone to rupture an can cause pelvic pain and massive bleeding. Also an abnormal intrauterine pregnancy can also cause pain. This needs to be ruled out. If you feel the ER is not right for you (though I would strongly strongly recommend it) seeing your primary care doctor would be the next option for an outpatient nonemergent ultrasound, however any doctor properly trained would tell you not to come to their office but to go to the ER instead if you told them why you were making an appointment with them.

Customer:

what is abnormal intrauterine pregnancy?

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

A pregnancy that isn't taking hold and is on its way to being self-terminated (this happens in nearly half of all fertilizations, it just goes unnoticed believe it or not). there is also the possibility of normal pregnancy, however the ones I mentioned first are the most concerning and time important.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Did you get all that

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

?

Customer:

is that even possible?

Customer:

ok

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Yes it is.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

I see women scanned for that at least a couple times every night I take call.

Customer:

so how would i know if it is a intrauterine pregnancy?

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Ultrasound. combined with a pregnancy test

Customer:

hello

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Yes, ultrasound combined with a pregnancy test.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

Did you get that? - i said ultrasound combined with a pregnancy test would confirm intrauterine pregnancy

Customer:

ok so it should show positive on a pregnancy test?

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

If there is a pregnancy within the uterus yes it would.

Daniel Sheibley, MD :

but not reliably on home pregnancy tests, I am talking about the blood pregnancy test done in the hospital

Customer:

thank you

Daniel Sheibley, MD :
Customer:

ok

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