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Dr. Robert
Dr. Robert, Doctor
Category: Medical
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Experience:  M.B.B.S, Experienced Family Physician
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How serious is Rumatoid Arthritis in a 19 year old girl and

Resolved Question:

How serious is Rumatoid Arthritis in a 19 year old girl and what treatment is suggested?
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  Dr. Robert replied 3 years ago.
Hello,
Dear customer

Welcome to justanswer.com and thank you for your question.
I'm so sorry to hear of discomfort of this girl due to rheumatoid arthritis.I will do whatever I can to help answer your questions:


Rheumatoid arthritis is autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joints. Its cause is unknown. It is suspected that certain infections or factors in the environment might trigger the immune system to attack the body's own tissues.

The most commonly affected joints are the small joints of the fingers, thumbs, wrists, feet, and ankles. However, any joint may be affected.

At her age of 19 years,for some people, it lasts only a few months or a year or two and goes away without causing any noticeable damage. Other people have mild or moderate forms of the disease, with periods of worsening symptoms, called flares, and periods in which they feel better, called remissions.

The earlier treatment is started, the less joint damage is likely to occur. Drugs can be used for pain relief, to reduce swelling, and to stop the disease from getting worse.

Two classes of medications are used in treating rheumatoid arthritis: fast-acting "first-line drugs" and slow-acting "second-line drugs" (also referred to as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or DMARDs). These DMARD's drugs can slow the progression of rheumatoid arthritis and save the joints and other tissues from permanent damage.

So my advise for this 19 year old girl is to make an appointment with rheumatologist for the best treatment option accordingly.


Hope this helped.

My goal is to provide you with excellent service – if you feel you have gotten anything less, please reply back, I am happy to address follow-up questions.

Thank you XXXXX
Dr. Robert






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