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Dr. D. Love
Dr. D. Love, Doctor
Category: Medical
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Experience:  Family Physician for 10 years; Hospital Medical Director for 10 years.
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I was born with many health complications, as a result

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Hello, I was born with many health complications, as a result I have ASD, ataxia and blind in one eye. I have just really learnt about my ASD diagnosis a few months back. My GP has only ever told me I have learning difficulties. What does this mean when someone is just considered learning difficulties what does the term actually mean and what could these difficulties mean as it doesn't sound a good diagnosis.
Also someone who shows all the symptoms of dysgraphia, can they be diagnosed with dysgraphia if they already have ataxia and dyslexia?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
Hello from JustAnswer.
Learning difficulties is a generic term that includes many different specific conditions, including dyslexia and dysgraphia. Some of these conditions may exist together and there also can be some degree of overlap. However, someone would usually not be considered as just having learning difficulties. The only exception would be in someone in whom testing is difficult and a specific condition cannot be identified. However, if you were diagnosed with dyslexia, then that would not apply to you.
Were you diagnosed with dyslexia?
Did you receive a formal learning and developmental assessment while you were still in school?
Expert:  DrRussMD replied 1 year ago.
HelloTo be exact, a learning disability is a diagnosis based on testing.Any learning deficit is measured on a scale that can be mathematically compared to the IQ.If the skill, say writing, is 30 points or more below the IQ on this cross comparison, then there is a disability.Your GP might be using the term in the generic sense, but it is not generic. It is measured by testing, typically by a PHD clinical /educational psychologist.To answer the rest of your question, having your current diagnoses does not preclude a diagnosis of disgraphia, which you could also have.The ASD diagnosis does not necessarily affect any of your other treatments or diagnoses.I will state that you should have help from more than simply your GP, and hope you have:PHD psychologist, neurologist.I am a double board certified doctor.Please click a positive so I am credited.Let me know if you have further questions.
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
I asked whether you have had a formal assessment, because these issues would have been addressed as part of that evaluation.
Expert:  DrRussMD replied 1 year ago.
HelloA GP would not be in a position to do a formal assessment of these matters.I will get back to who should in just a minute.To be exact, a learning disability is a diagnosis based on testing. It is a highly specific term, rather than a generic term.Any learning deficit is measured on a scale that can be mathematically compared to the IQ.If the skill, say writing, is 30 points or more below the IQ on this cross comparison, then there is a disability.Your GP might be using the term in the generic sense, but it is not generic. It is measured by testing, typically by a PHD clinical /educational psychologist.To answer the rest of your question, having your current diagnoses does not preclude a diagnosis of disgraphia, which you could also have.The ASD diagnosis does not necessarily affect any of your other treatments or diagnoses.I will state that you should have help from more than simply your GP, and hope you have:PHD psychologist, neurologist.I am a double board certified doctor.Please click a positive so I am credited.Let me know if you have further questions.
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
A formal learning and developmental assessment typically would not have been done by a GP.
Expert:  DrRussMD replied 1 year ago.
HiPlease see my additional services offerWe can go into integrative treatments for ASD.These are outside of conventional medicine.Please click a positive rating for Dr. Thomas
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
My IQ is 89 now, in schoo all I was ever told was I have learning difficulties, I was seen by an educational psychologist, speech therapist, I've only just been diagnosed with an ASD. I know that it states dyslexia and dyscalculia, dysgraphia don't effect intelligence but like I say my IQ is 89, I am struggling as my parents never got any help or claimed any benefit and now I'm older and can't explain properly my problems I always get turned away for any help. Could I still have dysgraphia and also dyscalculia on top of my dyslexia and ataxia and ASD diagnosis as I'm 28 and still worryingly don't really know myself. If my IQ is lower than average 100 could dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia still be a possible diagnosis?
Expert:  DrRussMD replied 1 year ago.
HelloYou could still have these diagnoses, but it is unlikely that you have all of them.Possible however; one does not preclude the other.I would be wary of any IQ measurement with anyone who had a number of disabilities. Special compensation for testing would be needed by the psychologist.In fact, IQ can be underestimated in this situation.In fact, if it has been some time, I suggest you be re assessed at this point.Please click a positive for Dr. Thomas.The rating scale is at the top of my answer page.Come back as needed.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
So in short sorry, what could this be, you say it's highly unlikely I have all of these, but it just has never been clear cut. I would also like to ask you if I may, I have heard about global development delay GDD. What is this and is it something that could some up my problems more clearly.
Expert:  DrRussMD replied 1 year ago.
I see no other diagnoses than what you have.As to adding diagnoses, this is based on testing.I do not think you have to add any diagnoses at this point.And I don't thing, given the history, that it would be GDD.As you stated, this resulted from known events at birth.In any case, there can be no precise diagnosis without testing. Anything else would be a wild guess, and we certainly do not diagnose or treat on the site.Good luck.Please click a positive at this point.
Expert:  DrRussMD replied 1 year ago.
HiBesides having a degree in psychology.... I am board certified in integrative medicine, internal medicine, trained in functional medicine and homeopathy, etc. I am here daily: use my request link as needed and “for Dr. Thomas” in the question title. Give that link to friends, family, associates, etc. Find me as needed for correct, safe and accurate answers. Please do not forget a positive rating: we are only paid PER rating, for bonuses, and for additional service offers that are accepted. Do that, then come back if needed.And find me anytime in medical by request.
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
I do not agree with several aspects of the other expert's answer. First, he is not correctly distinguishing between a learning difficulty and a learning deficit. A learning difficulty applies to the process by which the brain handles information, not the numeric deviation from the IQ that he states. Second, the terms, learning difficulty or learning disability, are generic terms that encompass many conditions. It is a generic term in the same way that saying that someone has heart disease is using a generic term. There are many specific types of heart disease, such as poor blood supply, poor pumping action, abnormal heart rhythms, etc., and all of these can be referred to as heart disease. Similarly, in someone with a documented learning difficulty, such as yourself, the doctor can use a specific term, such as dyslexia, or the generic term. In someone with multiple specific learning difficulties/disabilities, the doctor may also use the generic term to include all of the specific conditions that have been diagnosed in that individual. The fact that your doctor has used this term is no different than if he were to use all of the specific diagnoses. If you have had a proper assessment, which is what I have tried to identify from my first post, and that could have been done by an Educational Psychologist, then the diagnoses that were identified as a result of that assessment are the diagnoses that would be appropriate in your case. If you have not had a proper assessment, then the other expert is correct that the assessment must be done to get a proper diagnosis. However, no doctor or psychologist can tell you over the internet that you do or do not have any specific diagnoses. And if you were diagnosed with three different learning difficulties as part of that assessment, then no doctor can tell you over the internet that you probably do not have all three. If I can provide any clarification, please let me know.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Apparently I have learning difficulty as I have short term memory loss, but my IQ is 89. Why don't you believe this could be GDD. With my autism, i scored 30 I believe I was just marginally under the actual score but they said with my symptoms they could diagnose me with actually having ASD . I only don't look at people if I'm nervous or I'm angry or sad, I often don't pick up on when people are being sarcastic etc but I do occationally understand jokes, I lack empathy with people, I get obsessed about various topics and want routine, I have sensory issues and up until I was 23, would rock back and fourth, when I was a child if I got upset I would flap my hands and when I was bored would spin around in circles. I would also a lot of the time at home show aggressive behaviour. Could all this be autism or could there possibly be another diagnosis for all of this.
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
Although you are having many symptoms, they severity of symptoms that you describe do not appear to be at a level of severity to be GDD. The symptoms that you describe in this post certainly are consistent with the diagnosis of ASD, so all of these could be due to ASD, but it does not appear to be of severity for GDD. I realize that it may be difficult to fully explain the severity of symptoms over the internet, which is why it ultimately would require a proper assessment to determine which conditions are present, including whether there is GDD. But from that perspective, if the assessments that were done by an appropriate mental health profession did not show any suspicion for GDD, that is also strong evidence that you do not have GDD. And this would apply to the recent assessment during which you were assessed for ASD or a previous assessment for learning difficulties/disabilities. Please let me know if I can provide any additional information.Once I have answered all your questions, please remember to provide a positive rating.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
What severity does GDD have to be then and how come my GP and doctors have failed to diagnose me until just recently at age 28. Also you may have already answered this, but if someone is diagnosed with having short term memory loss, can that person still be diagnosed with dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia and so on or if it is down purely to there short memory, could this be used as a diagnosis to say that is why I have difficulty with learning without any other labels added to it, as this seems to be what has happened. Growing up they told me, I have learning difficulties due to short term memory loss. Can you please explain what this means as I cannot make head nor tail of it.
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
GDD is typically much more severe and becomes apparent during childhood when they are being assessed for meeting developmental milestones. Short term memory loss is a non-specific symptom and is not necessarily related to any specific learning disability. However, short term memory loss can affect the ability to learn. For example, if there were a brain injury that caused neurologic damage that affected short term memory loss, then it would affect the ability of the brain to input information into short term memory before it is ultimately transferred to long term memory. The assessment for the various learning disabilities can still be done in someone with short term memory loss, although the assessment would focus on the aspects of testing that is not dependent on short term memory. Please remember to provide a positive rating.
Dr. D. Love, Doctor
Category: Medical
Satisfied Customers: 18443
Experience: Family Physician for 10 years; Hospital Medical Director for 10 years.
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Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Can someone who scores over 32 in an autism test, turn out not to be autistic? I just don't know how and why my GP, schools
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
And paediatrician failed to get me diagnosed. I just don't know what to do, I have had very little help growing up. Could someone who scores high in an autism test turn out not to have autism?
Expert:  Dr. D. Love replied 1 year ago.
Yes, it is possible. The tests for autism are tools that aid in the diagnosis, but it is frequently not a simple determination, and the test should be considered along with the history of the individual. Someone with high functioning forms of autism can be missed fairly often, particularly when there are other problems that are causing symptoms. Usually, working with a counselor is the best option to address the various symptoms related to ASD.