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Ask Dr. Norm S. Your Own Question
Dr. Norm S.
Dr. Norm S., Board Certified OB/GYN
Category: OB GYN
Satisfied Customers: 11252
Experience:  Over 30 years of experience in OB/GYN practice, including teaching students. Fellow of American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
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I was placenta previa baby and my mum had to be transfused.

Customer Question

I was placenta previa baby and my mum had to be transfused. My dd gave birth to her first child (now a healthy 6yr old<3) but straight after his birth her placenta disintegrated. He was a couple of weeks early as was she herself. Both my pregnancies were healthy experiences all round. Wondering about why this happens, what's it called, does it have a generational/DNA component? I work with mums who have birth trauma that needs released, so this is professional curiosity. Thank you!
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: OB GYN
Expert:  Dr. Norm S. replied 3 years ago.
Hello and welcome.
I am Dr. Norm, and I look forward to helping you today.
What is dd - dear daughter?
Do you have any further details about the placenta that disintegrated? What happened next? Thank you.
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Hi Dr Norm

It was to be a homebirth, but transfer happened, luckily. Baby's head was as big as a rugby ball and tore through the clitoris (my clitoris is broken, she was later heard to say. Baby was totally fine and as she tells it recently the placenta went whoosh in pieces onto the floor. The nurses said 'don't look there, so much blood'. She was stitched up and kept in hospital for a week - no infection, baby a bit jaundiced so put under blue lamp for a couple of days. They came home and haven't looked back. Next birth went really well. This is an example of the kind of thing I hear from moms, so using the personal story to build my understanding of the trauma perceptions. By the way, dear daughter, was shocked but not majorly. Moms who have unresolved trauma from previously seem to have a harder time of it.

Expert:  Dr. Norm S. replied 3 years ago.
I've delivered thousands of babies, and I've never seen a placenta disintegrate. It sounds like the placenta came out suddenly along with a lot of blood. That happens fairly regularly. Usually we catch it so it doesn't fall on the floor, but if it did, most placentas won't fall to pieces, since they're pretty firm. There may have been lots of clots, and clots look much like placenta. A placenta that falls apart suggests an unhealthy placenta, but that doesn't fit well with a baby being totally fine.
So my guess is that the placenta came out suddenly with much blood and clots, but probably was a normal placenta. The main problem was the large baby head and tearing of the vagina and clitoris. I don't think there is any relationship to your mother's placenta previa.
As you suggest, trauma perceptions can be very different from what actually happens. We all see things in light of our past history, especially regarding trauma.
There certainly are things that seem to run in families, such as fast deliveries, easy labors, etc., but there are so many exceptions that it's hard to make any rule.
Each birth trauma needs to be dealt with on the basis of the individual woman and her own perceptions of it, whether fact based or not. I hope that's helpful.
Dr. Norm S. and other OB GYN Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 3 years ago.
Thank you. I shall check with my daughter in such a way as to reassure/have her verify what actually happened - maybe faulty facts got lodged in her perception. That is indeed useful. I appreciate your input, also yes, every mom is different and the triggers unique. My job is to listen very well. It does make a difference. Bye.
Expert:  Dr. Norm S. replied 3 years ago.
You're welcome. And I agree with you about listening.
Expert:  Dr. Norm S. replied 3 years ago.
Thank you for your payment.