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LondonlawyerJ
LondonlawyerJ, Solicitor
Category: Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 814
Experience:  Experienced solicitor
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I live in a first floor flat, the ground floor flat has a couple

Resolved Question:

I live in a first floor flat, the ground floor flat has a couple of trees, one at the front and one at the back, the one at the front is getting quite big and is blocking out light, the one out the back is that big now that not only is it blocking out light it is now starting to hit the roof and i don't think it will be long before it starts to dislodge the slate tiles and damage the guttering, do i have the right to trim the trees down to a reasonable height?
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Property Law
Expert:  LondonlawyerJ replied 3 years ago.

LondonlawyerJ :

Hello. I am a solicitor with over 15 years experience. I will tr to help. Are you a tenant and if so who is the landlord?

Customer:

No i own the flat

LondonlawyerJ :

If the tree is in heir garden (rather than a communal one) then there is very little that you can do. There is no right to light and there will be no legal remedy that you can seek for the blocking of light. However, if your property is caused foreseeable damage by the trees then you might well be able to claim compensation for the cost of repairs. I would suggest you point out your concerns to your neighbour. Any damage caused will now be foreseeable and therefore more likely to be actionable and the neighbour may wish to avoid any future liability.

LondonlawyerJ :

What to do next depends to a large extent on your relationship with your neighbour. But the short answer is that you will not be able to take any legal action until damage is caused when you could seek compensation and an order requiring remedial work to the trees.

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