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Remus2004
Remus2004, Barrister
Category: Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 70208
Experience:  Over 5 years in practice.
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If I have a break clause in my tenancy agreement and have given

Resolved Question:

If I have a break clause in my tenancy agreement and have given the appropriate notice, do I still need to keep paying rent after the notice period has past till the new tenant moves in?
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Property Law
Expert:  Remus2004 replied 2 years ago.
Thank you for your question. My name is ***** ***** I will try to help with this.
Is this an AST?
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

yes, joint tenancy

Expert:  Remus2004 replied 2 years ago.
Thanks.
When should the contract end?
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

The full term was for 12 months. That would have ended in November this year. The break clause was at 3 months

Expert:  Remus2004 replied 2 years ago.
are there any restrictions upon the break clause?
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

No, there are no restrictions.
I was asked to assist with finding a new tenant, make the room available for viewings

Expert:  Remus2004 replied 2 years ago.
Thank you.
This doesn't make a lot of sense on the face of it.
Either there is a break clause entitling you to leave or there is not.
If there is, and you exercised it properly, then you are entitled to leave and be free from payment obligations when the notice comes to an end. If there is not then you are liable until the new tenant moves in. You seem to be describing requests made of you that would suggest that this falls into the latter category where a new tenant must be found to release you from your obligations. If that is not what your contract says then it should not be demanded of you.
Can I clarify anything for you?
Jo
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