How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask TaxRobin Your Own Question
TaxRobin
TaxRobin, Tax Consultant
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 15716
Experience:  International tax
14155347
Type Your Tax Question Here...
TaxRobin is online now

When calculating the 10% wear and Tear allowance does one have

Resolved Question:

When calculating the 10% wear and Tear allowance does one have to deduct from the rent received council tax and Utilities paid by the landlord for the time there is no Tenant when the property is vacant between lets
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  TaxRobin replied 2 years ago.
Hello and thank you for allowing me to assist you.
Once a rental business has started, all activities will be treated as carried out in the course of letting. As long as the property was still available for letting and was not used by the individual for other purposes then no change would be made for calculating the wear and tear.
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

This is not the question I asked. Let me put it another way

If one tries to let a property for 1 year but is only successful in letting for 6 months and it is empty for 6 months and previously one has claimed 10% wear how does one calculate the 10% wear and tear allowance? Does one have to deduct from the 6 months rent received the council tax and utility charges paid by the landlord for the 6 month when the property had no tenant and no rent was received?

Expert:  TaxRobin replied 2 years ago.
Not as long as the property was still available for let.
The wear and tear is a 10% expense from the rents received.
No consideration of vacant periods is accounted for. The net rent that was received is used for the 10% calculation.
TaxRobin and other Tax Specialists are ready to help you