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Sam
Sam, Accountant
Category: Tax
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I earn roughly £45k as does my partner (income fluctuates

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Hi
I earn roughly £45k as does my partner (income fluctuates slightly each year) through PAYE jobs. We also earn an extra £20-£40k gross from renting out our main family home on sites like Air BnB, HomeAway and TripAdvsior.
I'm wondering on the best Tax Treatment of the house income to minimise our liability. Most of the income is made up of renting out the whole house while we decamp but a proportion is also 'Rent a Room' eligible as we sometimes have paying guests through the sites in our spare room whilst we stay in the house.
I've started by increasing our contributions to our respective pensions up to the max amount that's matched by our employers to take our PAYE earnings below the 40% tax band as far as possible. I could obviously do more of this ie sacrifice more salary to the pensions. The current levels also allow us to keep our full child benefit (2 kids).
What's the best way to structure the home rental business?
This is the end of our first year of trading and at present I am intending to account for this in our tax returns as if we are both sole traders. Part way through the year I switched the income from going into my bank account to going into my partners (we're not married but obviously live in the same house) to take advantage of both tax allowances up to the higher threshold.
Questions:
1) Is switching who gets the income into the bank account enough for us to be able to each account for some of the income in our tax returns (the parts that have gone in to our own bank accounts)? That way I can use up a bit of our tax allowance each.
2) Would we better off starting a Partnership or Ltd Co to handle this income? If we do a Partnership and specify % of profits each, how easy is it to change this % during the year (as situation with our earnings become clearer?)
3) Can we write off expenses against this income as normal for any other business eg bedding, towels, toiletries, cleaning materials, cleaner, specialist house insurance, letting site fees? How do we account for a proportion of household bills (these are hugely increased due to the letting periods). How does this work on each tax return when some of the bills are in joint names? eg can we claim gas bill expenses against house rental income coming to me in first 6 months of the year then claim same expenses against house rental income coming to my partner in second 6 months of the year even though gas bill is in joint names? What about capital works on the house? (BTW we don't qualify for the FHL regime as don't rent the house out enough).
4) Can we each take advantage of the Rent a Room Allowance or only once between the 2 of us? Again, would be prove eligibility by switching who gets income part way through the year?
5) Will we each get the forthcoming £1000 Sharing Economy Allowance or only once between the 2 of us? Again, would we prove eligibility by switching who gets the income part way through the year?
My goal is that we stay below the 40% tax band for the entirety of our income.
Thanks
Lisa
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  bigduckontax replied 1 year ago.
Hello Lisa, I am Keith, one of the experts on Just Answer, and pleased to be able to help you with your question. Firstly please remember that Pension Contributions, the aggregate of yours and your employer's contribution must not exceed 45K in the current tax year. Fortunately as you are not married or in civil partnership you can split the rental income equally with no difficulty. Making a formal partnership will make little difference. If you change the split of rentals HMRC will almost certainly treat the partnership as phony. If you form a limited company then the rentals will be subject to Corporation Tax (CT) at 20%, but if you are directors then all emoluments paid out must be through PAYE channels. Also, if you do not do this HMRC will almost certainly onoke ir35 which will make the payments subject to PAYE in any case. There is also the palaver of running and accounting for the company. All the expenses you mention can be set against rentals. You would be very well advised to keep a hard copy record of these to support your position in the event of an HMRC inquiry or investigation. The Rent a Room Allowance applies at a half each in the event of Joint Ownership [HMRC Advice Note PIM4001] The Sharing Economy Allowance is a trifle vague in its intentions. Certainly, the first 1K of rentals will be tax free, but releases are silent as to whether it applies to both parties of is half each. However, the general tenor of opinion is that it will be 1k each. I do hope that you have found my reply of assistance.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Keith
Re: Pensions, Great, thank you.
1) The answer to my orignal question isn't quite clear to me here. Do you mean that the rental income needs to be split equally ie 50/50 each year for us both to use our tax allowances against it? What I was getting at in my original question was - can it be split unequally? eg I get the first 4 months payments of the financial year into my bank account. I'm then getting towards the 40% threshold and so switch the next 8 months payments to go into my partner's bank account. We each then submit tax returns as sole traders for the relevant 33% and 66% of the income with the relevant 4 and 8 months expenses written off against it - does this work? We would the vary this each year to take advantage of our tax allowances as our PAYE income dictates - so the %'s paid to each of us would change each year. I'm just not sure about this - surely if I was running say a mechanic business as a sole trader and the income was coming into my bank account for the first 5 months of the year and did my tax return based on that and the income then went into my boyfriends bank account for the second 7 months of the year and he put that on his tax return that wouldn't work. Is this different because we jointly own the house? Would it been seen as tax avoidance to switch who gets the income part way through the year?
2) In terms of phony Partnership, what does this mean in tax terms - what would we be contravening, can you expand? In terms of Limited Company - if we are due to pay 40% tax on the house income as sole traders, is the 20% Corporation Tax rate not better as long as we don't withdraw the money (eg we could keep it in the company?) Could we pay ourselves dividends or are you saying these would be subject to PAYE at 20%/40% anyway if that was the rate we were on?
3) As per original question - can capital works to house also be reclaimed eg soundproofing so guests don't annoy neighbours. Also, please see me gas bill example - what about joint bills being claimed as expenses on each person's sole trader tax return?
4) Great, thank you.
5) Great, thank you.
Thanks
Lisa
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Oh and the other bit missed - proportion of household bills. Our average gas and electric bills for own use before we rented out house were roughly £100 and £40 per month. They're now over £300 and £120 per month - do we simply apply a % to the bills and reclaim as expenses as long as we can evidence the thinking behind our % or is there a maximum we can claim?
Thanks
Lisa
Expert:  bigduckontax replied 1 year ago.
It would normally be split equally unless the title deeds to the property state to the contrary. This would change the ownership from a Split Tenancy to a Tenancy in common. HMRC look with askance on any other form of split of rentals. Your surmise regarding a limited company and taxation is correct providing you do not withdraw the moneys. Dividends are all but a dead duck as they are grossed up to the highest rates of tax for individual recipients and also do not count against th company's CT computation, effectively being taxed in both the company's and the individual's hands. Utility and other bills would be split in the same manner as rentals, presumably 50/50 irrespective of who pays them. Your record of expenses which advised you to maintain will provide an adequate audit trail of any split. Capital works like sound proofing is capital expenditure and is added to the acquisition cost to reduce the capital gain in the long term against the selling proceeds to calculate the exposure for Capital Gains Tax (CGT) when this house is disposed of at some indeterminate time in the future. Please be so kind as to rate me before you leave the Just Answer site.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi
Just some final clarifications on the original questions (as numbered above and below) and then am of course happy to rate:
1) Could just one of us do the income/costs from the holiday rental business ie one of us enter 100% of the business in our tax return or does it have to be 50/50 as house is joint ownership? Are you absolutely sure about your advice on the 50/50 split being the only one HMRC will accept? I found the following guidance in a TaxCafe book (however perhaps it only relates to properties other than main residence):
"Property between Unmarried Couples
joint owners who are not married can agree to
split the rental income in a different proportion to their legal
ownership of the property.
Hence, an unmarried couple who own a property in equal shares
could agree that one person is entitled to 75% of the rental income
and the other is entitled to 25%.
It is important to have the income split properly documented in a
signed and dated profit-sharing agreement before the start of the
tax year, and it is probably advisable to have the income paid into
separate bank accounts"
2) It's not clear to me since this business is property related what regime it falls under for tax purposes - Landlord ie Rental Income, Property Investor or Normal Self Employed? I see that expenses are different for each and want to make sure I'm on the right one. As a reminder it's our main family home and located in Scotland.
3) You mentioned CapEx could be set off against CGT on sale. Surely there would be no CGT as this is our main residence? Or does running some kind of business from there make it CGT liable?
Thanks
Lisa
Expert:  bigduckontax replied 1 year ago.
Right Lisa I use Tax Cafe myself as a guidance so if they suggest that income can be split other than 50/50 then I am prepared to accept the position, but as they warn make sure it is well documented to head off HMRC! Paying into spearate bank accounts is a good idea. If it is your sole or main domestic residence then there would normally be no CGT as PRR would apply. However, your original question specifically states that you decamp when it is let which could cause you problems which is why I mentioned CGT. You did not actually use the magic words 'sole of main domestic residence' which does make a difference. I warn you that you will have a battle in the longer term with HMRC when you sell unless your rental income falls within the parameters of the Rent a Room scheme. Please be so kind as to rate me before you leave the Just Answer site. Remember that in Scotland tax is slowly being devolved to Hollyrood, IT came over effective 16/17 tax year so things may change.
Expert:  Nicola-mod replied 1 year ago.
Hello,
It seems the professional has left this conversation. This happens occasionally, and it's usually because the professional thinks that someone else might be a better match for your question. I've been working hard to find a new professional to assist you with your question, but sometimes finding the right professional can take a little longer than expected.
I wonder whether you're OK with continuing to wait for an answer. If you are, please let me know and I will continue my search. If not, feel free to let me know and I will cancel this question for you.
Thank you!
Nicola
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi
I'm fine with waiting if you can find someone who will actually know the answer, if not am happy to cancel the question
Thanks
Lisa
Expert:  Nicola-mod replied 1 year ago.
Hello,
We will continue to look for a Professional to assist you.
Thank you for your patience,
Nicola
Expert:  Sam replied 1 year ago.
HI I can assist if you like - I am Sam and I am also one of the UK tax experts here on Just Answer, would like me to provide a more complete answer? If so then could you expand on the information provided. 1) Do you always stay in this house - when you have lodgers/tenants/guests2) Do you just provide room - or are meals provided for any of the guests3) Are these short term lets (so 1 7 nights) or long term4) When did this begin 5) Do you currently declare this income to HMRC - if so have you previously claimed rent a room or just declared it as rental income or trade income and has this been 50:50 split6) Is the property treated as 50:50 for any mortgage or legal purposes - are you tenants in common or joint owners - or has this not been identified or legally drawn up?7) how many bedrooms are there to the property - and how many are for your exclusive use and how many other habitable rooms are there (excluding bathroom and kitchen) and of those other habitable rooms how many are your "guests" allowed to make use of 8) Do you have a mortgage on the property - is this a normal repayment loan - if so how much of the mortgage payment is the interest element of the repayment 9) What rents do you collect both on a regular ongoing basis and that which might fall under AirB&B ( so now and again) Thanks Sam
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Sam
I've simplified my question as much as possible and pasted below along with the info you ask for:
1) Can we claim rent a room relief against the room rentals part of the income AND claim expenses against the whole house part of the income (as if it were normal rental income)? Or do the whole house rentals rule out Rent a Room relief on the room part of it?
2) Is it property income or trading income in terms of filling out tax return? I know B&B's are trading income but since we're not a B&B, is it Property Income?
3) If not going down Rent a Room route, what expenses can we claim - just the ordinary Property Income ones? Can we claim CapEx (eg soundproofing so guests don't annoy neighbours)
4) What about CGT liability. I understand we're exempt as a main residence but running any kind of business there may make us liable. If it makes us liable for CGT then I am assuming I can claim all CapEx against future CGT liability?
5) How do we apportion expenses between us and the business? For example, our gas and elec bills are much higher during whole house rentals and we have extra insurance costs. If we only claimed the excess gas and elec on a per diem basis for rentals we will be out of pocket as guests use a lot more than we do each day. Can we simply account for this as an estimate of what it costs over and above our normal bills?
6) We own the house 50/50 on the deeds. Can just one of us account for the entire income on their tax return or do we have to account for the income 50/50 (I realise that Rent a Room relief gets split). Could we also elect to share the profits on a different split from the deeds? (I read something in a TaxCafe book about this being legitimate). It might be useful for us to have the ability to do this to use up our tax allowances should one of us earn significantly more or less in our day jobs in future.Info you asked for:
1) Do you always stay in this house - when you have lodgers/tenants/guests.
No. We do 2 seperate things. We rent out one room to Air BnB guests when we are staying in the house. We also rent out the whole house to holidaymakers on Air BnB, HomeAway and Tripadvisor and move out when we have whole house rentals.2) Do you just provide room - or are meals provided for any of the guests
Room only
3) Are these short term lets (so 1 7 nights) or long term
Short term. For the room - 1 to 7 nights. For the whole house 1 to 14 nights.4) When did this begin
July 2015.
5) Do you currently declare this income to HMRC - if so have you previously claimed rent a room or just declared it as rental income or trade income and has this been 50:50 split
Not currently declared as just about to do tax return for last year as this was first year of trade.
6) Is the property treated as 50:50 for any mortgage or legal purposes - are you tenants in common or joint owners - or has this not been identified or legally drawn up?
We own the house 50/50 on the deeds. We are in Scotland so I believe there is another term for it here.7) how many bedrooms are there to the property - and how many are for your exclusive use and how many other habitable rooms are there (excluding bathroom and kitchen) and of those other habitable rooms how many are your "guests" allowed to make use of
5 bedrooms. Air BnB room only guests use their 1 bedroom with ensuite bathroom. The rest of the house is for our exclusive use when room only guests are in so we have 4 bedrooms, living room, bathroom, kitchen.
Whole house rental guests get whole house access - 5 bedrooms, living room, bathroom, ensuite and kitchen.
8) Do you have a mortgage on the property - is this a normal repayment loan - if so how much of the mortgage payment is the interest element of the repayment
No mortgage so no interest to write off.
9) What rents do you collect both on a regular ongoing basis and that which might fall under AirB&B ( so now and again)
We don't collect regular rents - we have no lodgers or long term tenants, all income is from the 2 sources - Air BnB room only or whole house rentals to holidaymakers. Last year our income for the Air BnB room only was £7k and for whole house rentals on Air BnB, HomeAway and Tripadvisor was £13k. I expect it to be more this year, with the split much more towards whole house rentals and away from room rentals.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
To give an idea of how often we do this - from July 2015 to present - we had room bookings every night during that period except for a handful of nights with no booking, maybe 10 or so. This was interspersed with a handful of full house bookings. So basically nearly all the time we have either a room booking or a whole house booking. However, for FHL purposes we are nowhere near the threshold with whole house rentals in terms of nights.
Expert:  Sam replied 1 year ago.
Hi Thanks for your response In answer to your questions 1) Can we claim rent a room relief against the room rentals part of the income AND claim expenses against the whole house part of the income (as if it were normal rental income)? Or do the whole house rentals rule out Rent a Room relief on the room part of it? No its either or and if you have a mix of incomes arising (such as a qualifying rent a room and also normal rental income or trade income) then it would all have to be treated as normal rental income or trade income 2) Is it property income or trading income in terms of filling out tax return? I know B&B's are trading income but since we're not a B&B, is it Property Income?If you provide no services (such as breakfast or evening meals) then its all normal rental income 3) If not going down Rent a Room route, what expenses can we claim - just the ordinary Property Income ones? Can we claim CapEx (eg soundproofing so guests don't annoy neighbours)Yes you would claim the normal expenses for rental income 0 with the exception of needing to apportion them according to how many guests you have and what areas of the property are communal etc The Capex would be an expens that you would claim when you sell the property as you will have a capital gain position to consider, so this and any other capital expenditure that improves the property (such as new kitchen and bathroom) which would be apportioned against the fact this also remains your home 4) What about CGT liability. I understand we're exempt as a main residence but running any kind of business there may make us liable. If it makes us liable for CGT then I am assuming I can claim all CapEx against future CGT liability? Yes you are right and see my response to Question 35) How do we apportion expenses between us and the business? For example, our gas and elec bills are much higher during whole house rentals and we have extra insurance costs. If we only claimed the excess gas and elec on a per diem basis for rentals we will be out of pocket as guests use a lot more than we do each day. Can we simply account for this as an estimate of what it costs over and above our normal bills?This is why I asked for the ratio of rental to private as its fair to say as this si your home much of the expenses are always going to be due to this factor - so by the room ration or sq foot method would be an acceptable claim. you should not estimate or this allows HMRC scope to argue these down. 6) We own the house 50/50 on the deeds. Can just one of us account for the entire income on their tax return or do we have to account for the income 50/50 (I realise that Rent a Room relief gets split). Could we also elect to share the profits on a different split from the deeds? (I read something in a TaxCafe book about this being legitimate). It might be useful for us to have the ability to do this to use up our tax allowances should one of us earn significantly more or less in our day jobs in future. Not unless you have evidence that one of you has a different input into the purchase (either through deposit placed down or the mortgage payments - ) and as your income (earned) is about the same this would be a fruitless exercise to undertake unless you have something that was put in place when you purchased the property to show the ration ownership differed.You have to remember this is your home first and foremost . so as per deeds and lifestyle this is 50:50 unlike a second property thats is ONLY rented out - which you then have more scope to modify the figure of ownership a little or as per the facts of who put what ration of cost into the property. I then see you answered my questions - so I shall add these in and then add to the responses given from your questions - to firm up the answers to your actual position.You advsie 1) Do you always stay in this house - when you have lodgers/tenants/guests.No. We do 2 seperate things. We rent out one room to Air BnB guests when we are staying in the house. We also rent out the whole house to holidaymakers on Air BnB, HomeAway and Tripadvisor and move out when we have whole house rentals. Where do you go when you rent out the whole house and how frequently might this happen and this means you cannot use rent a room this has to be rental income less expenses - as advised above2) Do you just provide room - or are meals provided for any of the guestsRoom onlyThen cannot be treated as trade income and has to be rental income as advsied above 3) Are these short term lets (so 1 7 nights) or long termShort term. For the room - 1 to 7 nights. For the whole house 1 to 14 nights.Further clarifies that this is rental income not trade and cannot be rent a room 4) When did this beginJuly 2015.So as first year is 2015/2016 - then its esential we have helped you get this right for this year and onwards 5) Do you currently declare this income to HMRC - if so have you previously claimed rent a room or just declared it as rental income or trade income and has this been 50:50 splitNot currently declared as just about to do tax return for last year as this was first year of trade.Understood and fyi its not trade income its just rental income (just as the two meanings have completely different connotations! (as you can see above !) 6) Is the property treated as 50:50 for any mortgage or legal purposes - are you tenants in common or joint owners - or has this not been identified or legally drawn up?We own the house 50/50 on the deeds. We are in Scotland so I believe there is another term for it here.Then due to the fact i) this is your main home and you live here much of the time and ii) this is 50:50 on the deeds then the rental income also has to be 50:507) how many bedrooms are there to the property - and how many are for your exclusive use and how many other habitable rooms are there (excluding bathroom and kitchen) and of those other habitable rooms how many are your "guests" allowed to make use of5 bedrooms. Air BnB room only guests use their 1 bedroom with ensuite bathroom. The rest of the house is for our exclusive use when room only guests are in so we have 4 bedrooms, living room, bathroom, kitchen.Whole house rental guests get whole house access - 5 bedrooms, living room, bathroom, ensuite and kitchen.Then you will need to break all bills down as follows​i) when you let the whole house out - then the costs for Gas Elec. Mortgage Interest,Insurance, Water (In and Out) TV Licence, Broadband Cable TV etc can be claimed 100% for those periods plus Laundery and cleaning products (Maybe try and keep the cleaning products as seperate so you can identify a truer cost!) ii) When you have house share guests then if there are you two and two others then 50% of the bills and if just 1 other than 33% of the bills - so its up to you to keep a diary (as it were) of what happens when!8) Do you have a mortgage on the property - is this a normal repayment loan - if so how much of the mortgage payment is the interest element of the repaymentNo mortgage so no interest to write off.Noted 9) What rents do you collect both on a regular ongoing basis and that which might fall under AirB&B ( so now and again)We don't collect regular rents - we have no lodgers or long term tenants, all income is from the 2 sources - Air BnB room only or whole house rentals to holidaymakers. Last year our income for the Air BnB room only was £7k and for whole house rentals on Air BnB, HomeAway and Tripadvisor was £13k. I expect it to be more this year, with the split much more towards whole house rentals and away from room rentals.Noted so this just clarifies that this is normal rental income and the ratio of bills as advised above If you had just rented this out as a holiday home you could have considered furnished holiday lets but it has to be exclusive as holiday lets for this to apply - BUT you are no better off through having to treat this just as rental income and in fact if trade income you would incur National Insurance (class 2 and 4) as well - so in fact be worse off! Then finally capital gains - as you will have from July 2015 started to let out your property in various ways - where you have generated income HOWEVER as you are not claiming mortgage interest and this is NOT trade income I advsie DO NOT claim anything for property (council) Tax - then you will not be liable to any capital gains but it does mean that the CAPEX is then not claimable - as it cannot be offset against the rents as a property cost, rather than day to day out of pocket expense I hope that I have covered all you need but if I have missed anything off, or you wish furtehr clarification then do let me know. I shall probably be offline now for the eveing - so I hope a resposnse tomorrow would be acceptable. ThanksSam
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Sam
That's fantastic and very comprehensive. Just a few little points of clarification and an answer to your question and I am done:
1) So the rental income/expenses go in the Property Income section of the Self Assessment Return?
2) Apportioning bills as per amount of people in house eg 2 of us and 2 guests = 50/50. We also have 2 children (1 at 18 months and 1 due to be born this week hence trying to do my Tax Return (!) - does this make our share 4 people vs 2? Would HMRC count the kids as full people for this purpose?!
3) CapEx - I am shortly about to sell my old home which has been sitting empty for some time and this will crystallise a CGT loss of circa £45k as it's a second property. I intend to carry forward the CGT loss on next tax return. Given that I will have this loss and we intend to make significant CapEx on our current house, perhaps we would be better to claim the Council Tax bills proportionately and go through the CGT system? I guess I will need to crunch numbers on that. However, you said CGT would be apportioned against the fact this remains our home - what did you mean exactly and how would it be apportioned in reality?
4) Could you point me to a comprehensive document (HMRC or otherwise) that lists the expenses we can claim against rental income as these seem to vary depending on where you look.You asked where we go when we rent out the whole house. To date we have gone to my mother's house and stayed there. We also have a rustic cabin in the woods where we intend to go once it's renovated. I suspect it does't qualify as a second home as there is no running water or electricity - it cost us £5000 for the cabin and we pay a ground rent to the landowner for the land it's sited on.Thank you
Lisa
Expert:  Sam replied 1 year ago.
Hi Thanks for your follow up questions 1) So the rental income/expenses go in the Property Income section of the Self Assessment Return?Yes thats correct2) Apportioning bills as per amount of people in house eg 2 of us and 2 guests = 50/50. We also have 2 children (1 at 18 months and 1 due to be born this week hence trying to do my Tax Return (!) - does this make our share 4 people vs 2? Would HMRC count the kids as full people for this purpose?!At this time I would call it 50% - but as the kids get a litttle older and se to thewir own needs such as dvd and compluters etc - then adjust accordingly!3) CapEx - I am shortly about to sell my old home which has been sitting empty for some time and this will crystallise a CGT loss of circa £45k as it's a second property. I intend to carry forward the CGT loss on next tax return. Given that I will have this loss and we intend to make significant CapEx on our current house, perhaps we would be better to claim the Council Tax bills proportionately and go through the CGT system? I guess I will need to crunch numbers on that. However, you said CGT would be apportioned against the fact this remains our home - what did you mean exactly and how would it be apportioned in reality?​It means that you have let the property out at time both with you living there at at times vacating - which you indicate will continue - so whilst you will remain being due private residence relief when this is also your home, there is no escaping the need for the fact capital gains will need to be considered. How this works out in reality is not possible to say as it depends how long you carry this arrangement on for and how much the property increases in value over that period, and the apportionment of private residence and private lettings relief.But as you do at times vacate the property then take care that you do not attract business rates (even though this is not a trade) 4) Could you point me to a comprehensive document (HMRC or otherwise) that lists the expenses we can claim against rental income as these seem to vary depending on where you look.These are all listed on the Income from property notes - see link here https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/.../SA105-Notes-2015.pdSee Page 4 onward for a list and explanation as to what falls within each category.You asked where we go when we rent out the whole house. To date we have gone to my mother's house and stayed there. We also have a rustic cabin in the woods where we intend to go once it's renovated. I suspect it does't qualify as a second home as there is no running water or electricity - it cost us £5000 for the cabin and we pay a ground rent to the landowner for the land it's sited on. Thanks for this additional information but once the cabin is fully habitable then it will be treated as a second home Let me know if you require any further assistance - but if you have all that you need, then it would be appreciated if you could rate for the level of service I have provided (or click accept) Thanks Sam
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Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thanks Sam for your replies, very comprehensive. We're looking into getting a smart meter system for gas and electricity so we can download daily use and that should make apportioning simpler as we can match up the daily use to who was in the house at the time. Thanks again. Lisa
Expert:  Sam replied 1 year ago.
Hi Lisa You are very welcome That sounds like a great idea ! Then you can make sure you claim the correct and a more accurate amount. If you need any future assistance, then please do come back to Just Answer, and if you would prefer you can always ask for me Thanks Sam

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