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Vet
Vet, Veterinarian
Category: Vet
Satisfied Customers: 83
Experience:  I have spent many years in mixed practice, dealing with all the major species.
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Goat - a 10 year old nanny who hasnt ever calved. She is the

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Goat - a 10 year old nanny who hasnt ever calved. She is the kid of the now castrated billy and old nanny who have lived on the my hill for over 10years. There are two young female donkeys and a 30 year old retired Conemara mare also in the field of about 6 acres - including a grove of trees, a trough and also an open concreted shed.
Each of the goats seemed to be off colour for a week or so in turn but this little goat is actually ill. She appears to be trying to defeacate with violent stomach movements and makes an occasional pain sound. She is walking around a bit but also sitting down quite a lot with her back legs stretched out. I hadnt wormed her for some time - she is less tame than the others but I have given her 1/3 of an Equvalan Duo wormer and 10 mls of Milk of Magnesia. I did see her defeacating a little about 3 days ago. Curiously she doesnt seem worse and is eating about a handful of meal; she wasnt interested in Goats milk. The other goats arent over concerned. What do I do please?
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Vet
Expert:  Vet replied 2 years ago.
Vet :

Hi there, vet Andrew here.

Vet :

Hi again. I see you rated bad service, but we haven't had a chance to chat yet about your problem. Could you get in contact again so I can ask you some questions?

JACUSTOMER-qi6xt89d- : I am not permanently on line unfortunately. I tried to give you a full picture. I am a retired registered nurse and accustomed to giving full reports. I am concerned because I fear some sort of blockage. Unfortunately the local vets are not clued up about goats. I don't know whether I am doing more harm than good giving milk of magnesia or whether I should be giving a stronger laxative. I'm aware that in horses at any rate, colic is often worm related. I suspect the goat is lying with her legs stretched out because there is trapped wind in her gut. My experience is that goats have an amazing capacity to heal themselves and presumably have a very effective liver. In some ways I'm surprised that in herself she isn't worse than she is but I don't want lack of action on my part to be fatal for her because she is definitely a sick goat. I wonder if she is dehydrated but she wouldn't drink goats milk voluntarily. She is moving about in the field but mostly is sitting down. Normally she is the first of the three goats to run to me when I enter the field. Thank you for getting back to me.
Vet and 3 other Vet Specialists are ready to help you
Expert:  Vet replied 2 years ago.
Hi, not a problem. The chat function isn't always ideal for the diagnostic process. What you describe is colic, but as you know this is really a clinical sign rather than a diagnosis. Worm burdens can cause this if they are very heavy, but this is normally accompanied by weight loss, diarrhoea and sometimes pallor.
You don't say when the billy was castrated - are you sure this couldn't be pregnancy-related?
My first move would be to inspect your pasture for unusual plants, even if you're sure there aren't any. Excessive consumption of oak leaves, for example, can trigger gut cramps. Also any potential dietary poisons such as lead-painted woodwork. The fact that the other goats were affected probably rules out 'one-off' disorders such as bowel torsion.
Magnesium salts are sometimes effective in ruminants, but I have better success with liquid paraffin. Try 100ml BID. Offer high-quality hay or haylage, straw and a small quantity of concentrates. Goats are resilient creatures so you should find of you keep the bowel moving she will pull through. I hope this helps. Regards, ***** *****

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