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Ask Dr. Michael Salkin Your Own Question
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin, Veterinarian
Category: Vet
Satisfied Customers: 29767
Experience:  University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 45 years of experience.
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I have a 7 year old rescue lurcher who I have owned years.

Customer Question

I have a 7 year old rescue lurcher who I have owned for 6 years. She has been spayed and is in good health. Recently her nails (which are regularly trimmed by a professional) have started to split so you can see the underneath fleshy part. Her toes also look slightly twisted. The lady that trims her feet is sufficiently concerned and suggested I contact a vet.
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Vet
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 2 years ago.
The groomer is concerned that Honey suffers from symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy (idiopathic onychomadesis) which is suspected to be immune-mediated and eventually causes claw loss (onychomadesis). It's uncommon with the highest incidence reported in young adult to middle-aged dogs. Usually, an acute onset of nail loss occurs. Initially one to two claws are lost, but over the course of a few weeks to several months, all claws slough. Replacement claws are misshapen, soft or brittle, discolored, and friable and usually slough again. Differentials include fungal and bacterial claw infection, autoimmune skin disorders, drug eruption, and vasculitis and so contacting Honey's vet would be prudent in an attempt to clarify which of these disorders is causing the split and twisted toes/nails. Diagnosis of symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy is done by ruling out those other differentials, clinical symptoms and typical history. Biopsy isn't recommended in most cases. Please respond with further questions or concerns if you wish.
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Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 2 years ago.
Thank you for your kind accept. I appreciate it.
I can't set a follow up in this venue and so would appreciate your returning to our conversation with an update at your convenience.