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Zee J
Zee J,
Category: Cardiology
Satisfied Customers: 1301
Experience:  Expert
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Please I’m in pain

Customer Question

Please I’m in pain
Submitted: 19 days ago.
Category: Cardiology
Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

Hello and thanks for your question. I’d be pleased to assist you. Kindly answer following questions for further advice:

Age? Male or female?

Past medical history?

Any medicines using?

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

Without the requested information, I can only give you a fairly general answer. I hope it is helpful

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

If you need help now, but it's not an emergency:

  • go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111
  • speak to a pharmacist for advice on medicines or common problems like coughs, colds and rashes
  • see a GP or dentist

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

111 online can tell you:

  • where to get help for your symptoms, if you're not sure what to do
  • how to find general health information and advice
  • where to get an emergency supply of your prescribed medicine
  • how to get a repeat prescription

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

If you need to read more about your health issue then you can also read on the NHS website given below to get to know more about your issue

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

If you think it's an emergency:

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

An A&E department (also known as emergency department or casualty) deals with genuine life-threatening emergencies, such as:

  • loss of consciousness
  • a sudden confused state
  • fits that are not stopping
  • chest pain
  • breathing difficulties
  • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped
  • severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis)
  • severe burns or scalds
  • stroke
  • major trauma such as a road traffic collision
  • feelings of self-harm or suicide

Less severe injuries can be treated in urgent treatment centres (walk-in centres or minor injury units).

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

You can find the nearest Accident and emergency services on the NHS link given below:

https://www.nhs.uk/service-search/other-services/Accident-and-emergency-services/LocationSearch/428

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

In your case looks like you might be having some chest pain then if you think it is typical cardiac pain then you should go to local hospital emergency as soon as possible

Expert:  Zee J replied 19 days ago.

However, if you still would like to discuss your issue with me, please do ask me questions

I would be happy to help and answer your questions and guide you how to get best treatment

Customer: replied 18 days ago.
Hi I’ve been having serve squeezing pain in my heart extremely sore it is lasting all day and night for last two weeks. Got 2 chest X-rays, 4 ecgs and blood tests they were all clear. No palpitations or shortness of breath just serve squeezing heart pain. Right now the sqeezing pain is serve and I think I’m having a heart attack
Expert:  Zee J replied 18 days ago.
Thanks
Expert:  Zee J replied 18 days ago.

Did you have any heart scan also???

Expert:  Zee J replied 18 days ago.

I would suggest further investigations to rule out any underlying problems with heart perfusion

Expert:  Zee J replied 18 days ago.

1. Stress test. Your heart rhythm, blood pressure and breathing are monitored while you walk on a treadmill or ride a stationary bike. Exercise makes your heart pump harder and faster than usual, so a stress test can detect heart problems that might not be noticeable otherwise

2. Echocardiogram and Stress echocardiogram. A stress echocardiogram is similar to a regular echocardiogram, except the test is done after you exercise in the doctor's office on a treadmill or stationary bike.

3. Nuclear stress test. Small amounts of radioactive material are injected into your bloodstream. While you exercise, your doctor can watch as it flows through your heart and lungs — allowing blood-flow problems to be identified.

4. Coronary angiography. A dye is injected into the blood vessels of your heart. Then a series of X-ray images (angiograms) are taken, showing the dye's path. This test gives your doctor a detailed look at the inside of your blood vessels.

5. Cardiac CT scan. This test can determine if you have a buildup of calcium in your coronary arteries — a sign of coronary atherosclerosis. The heart arteries can also be seen using CT scanning (coronary CT angiogram).

Expert:  Zee J replied 18 days ago.

These tests would be helpful in determining any issues with cardiac blood supply or structural issues

Expert:  Zee J replied 18 days ago.

I am still here

Please do let me know if you have any further questions I would be happy to answer

Best of luck

Customer: replied 17 days ago.
Hello, I got an echo test two years ago and it was also clear. I am 18 years old and I am a female. The pain is there all the time it does not give relief when I rest or when I exercise it does not get worse with exercise either. My blood preassure is normal I have no palpitations or shortness of breath
Expert:  Zee J replied 17 days ago.
Then most likely it is not a heart problem
Expert:  Zee J replied 17 days ago.

Then the maximum you can do to find out any small issues with heart is do the following tests, although in my opinion not required as you do not seem to have any heart related issues:


Nuclear stress test. Small amounts of radioactive material are injected into your bloodstream. While you exercise, your doctor can watch as it flows through your heart and lungs — allowing blood-flow problems to be identified.

Coronary angiography. A dye is injected into the blood vessels of your heart. Then a series of X-ray images (angiograms) are taken, showing the dye's path. This test gives your doctor a detailed look at the inside of your blood vessels.