How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. Peter Your Own Question
Dr. Peter
Dr. Peter, Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 32754
Experience:  16 years of internal medicine, surgery, and preventive care.
25161683
Type Your Dog Question Here...
Dr. Peter is online now

MY BULLBOG HAS THROWN UP AND THEN STARTED TO SPASM. IT LASTED

This answer was rated:

MY BULLBOG HAS THROWN UP AND THEN STARTED TO SPASM. IT LASTED A FEW SECONDS HE FELLOVER AND LAYED THERE FOR MANY MINUTES. HE WAS AWAKE ALL THE TIME. HE IS NOW VERY DOCILE AND HAS BEEN FOR AN HOUR+
Welcome and thanks for asking your question. My name is***** am a licensed veterinarian. I am currently not set up to make a live call. But, I am happy to answer your question on this thread. First I need to ask you a few questions so that I can be well informed and give you the best advice. 1- When you say he started to spasm do you mean he was shaking?
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
yes
1- Is this the first time this happens? 2- How old is he? 3- Any pre existing medical conditions? 4- Did he vomit before or after the shaking?
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
once before, only briefly about 4 weeks ago. He is nearly 7. no other probs, yes he did vomit right before.
Give me a few minutes to type your answer. Thank you.
Friend, what you are describing is consistent with a seizure. It is common for the patient to vomit before the seizure event. When a dog seizes there could be an underlying medical problem causing the seizure. Possible causes for seizures in dogs are an under active thyroid (hypothyroidism), kidney or liver disease, hypoglycemia, brain tumors, idiopathic (unknown), etc. to name a few causes. One of the most common cause is idiopathic epilepsy, meaning we do not know why the brain behaves in such manner but we can control the seizures with medications (phenobarbital or/and potassium bromide). In this case, I would highly recommend a check up with family veterinarian for a hands on examination and blood work as initial screening test to rule out the above mentioned diseases. If the seizures occur more than once a month medication should be started to stop or prevent the seizures. For today observe him, if he seizes again I would have him checked by ER veterinarian.Please do not forget to rate my answer - I hope you found it to be excellent. If there’s more I can do, please use the reply tab and let me know. It’s my goal to provide you with excellent service." Thank you for your business and I hope to work with you again soon! Dr. Peter
Dr. Peter and 2 other Dog Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Thank you very much.
You're welcome.