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Ross Miller
Ross Miller,
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 1825
Experience:  Director (Litigation and Mediation) at Hilltop Solutions
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This is just a continuation of the old questions I have been

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This is just a continuation of the old questions I have been asking you . If I don’t sign the papers and continue being a shareholder , how can he come after me ? Can he take me to court ? The reason I am asking this question is because even though I resigned as a director I feel as if I put in so much work within starting this company , the idea , the business plan etc . I would like to get something out of this then just transferring all my shares to him . That being said if I continue being a shareholder will I have to do anything ? As in pay etc ?
Hello,

I've been working hard to find a Professional to assist you with your question, but sometimes finding the right Professional can take a little longer than expected.

I wonder whether you're ok with continuing to wait for an answer. If you are, please let me know and I will continue my search. If not, feel free to let me know and I will cancel this question for you.

Thank you!

As a shareholder I don't see what, if anything, you could possibly be taken to court for? The only thing that would affect you personally would be tax implications from dividends from your shares, but this is nothing to do with your ex, this is on your self assessment. As I have said previously, the liability is limited to the company and not you as a person. Secondly, if you don't want to give him your shares, then don't, he can't sue you for them, so if you want to keep them then keep them as they are yours to do with what you want. However, if your ex wants your shares then you can offer to sell them to him. To gauge the price of the shares you would have to value the company based on assets, liabilities, cash, future business etc. So if you have 50% of the shares and the company is worth £100k then £50k would be a fair price for your shares. This is entirely up to you. If you decide to keep the shares then there is no way he can take you to court to get the shares from you.

Kind regards

Ross

Kind regards

Ross

Ross Miller,
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 1825
Experience: Director (Litigation and Mediation) at Hilltop Solutions
Ross Miller and 3 other Family Law Specialists are ready to help you