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Just trying to get help with my sleep I wake after about two

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Hi just trying to get help with my sleep I wake after about two hours and can’t get back to sleep it’s been a problem for the last eleven years
JA: Have you seen a doctor about this yet? What medications are you taking?
Customer: yes I’ve been seeing doctors for the past eleven years not taking any meds at the moment as they don’t work
JA: What medications do you take daily? Are you allergic to any medications?
Customer: I have been taking zopiclone over the years no I am not allergic to any medication
JA: Is there anything else the Doctor should know before I connect you? Rest assured that they'll be able to help you.
Customer: no I don’t think so

Hi, Welcome to JustAnswer. Thank you for your question. I’m Dr. Gupta and I can help you today. I'll be back in a moment with my reply!

Dr. Gupta and 2 other Medical Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 13 days ago.
Thank you

Hi,

Over-the-counter sleep aids can be effective for an occasional sleepless night. There are a few caveats, however.
Most over-the-counter sleep aids contain antihistamines. Tolerance to the sedative effects of antihistamines can develop quickly — so the longer you take them, the less likely they are to make you sleepy.
In addition, some over-the-counter sleep aids can leave you feeling groggy and unwell the next day. This is the so-called hangover effect.
Medication interactions are possible as well, and much remains unknown about the safety and effectiveness of over-the-counter sleep aids.
Sleep aids: The options
Over-the-counter sleep aids are widely available. Common choices and the potential side effects include:
Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, Aleve PM, others). Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine. Side effects might include daytime drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation and urinary retention.
Doxylamine succinate (Unisom SleepTabs). Doxylamine is also a sedating antihistamine. Side effects are similar to those of diphenhydramine.
Melatonin. The hormone melatonin helps control your natural sleep-wake cycle. Some research suggests that melatonin supplements might be helpful in treating jet lag or reducing the time it takes to fall asleep — although the effect is typically mild. Side effects can include headaches and daytime sleepiness.
Valerian. Supplements made from this plant are sometimes taken as sleep aids. Although a few studies indicate some therapeutic benefit, other studies haven't found the same benefits. Valerian generally doesn't appear to cause side effects.
Store brands containing the same active ingredients as brand-name sleep aids are commonly available, too. Store brands have the same risks and benefits as their brand-name counterparts, often at a more reasonable cost.
Important precautions
When using over-the-counter sleep aids, follow these steps:
Start with your doctor. Ask your doctor if the sleep aid might interact with other medications or underlying conditions, and what dosage to take.
Keep precautions in mind. Diphenhydramine and doxylamine aren't recommended for people who have closed-angle glaucoma, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnea, severe liver disease, digestive system obstruction or urinary retention. In addition, sleep aids pose risks for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, and might pose risks to people over age 75, including an increased risk of strokes and dementia.
Take it one day at a time. Over-the-counter sleep aids are a temporary solution for insomnia. Generally, they're not intended to be used for longer than two weeks.
Avoid alcohol. Never mix alcohol and sleep aids. Alcohol can increase the sedative effects of the medication.
Beware of side effects. Don't drive or attempt other activities that require alertness while taking sleep aids.
Everyone benefits from a good night's sleep. If you continue to have trouble sleeping, talk to your doctor. In addition to lifestyle changes, he or she might recommend behavior therapy to help you learn new sleep habits and ways to make your sleeping environment more conducive to sleep. In some cases, short-term use of prescription sleep aids might be recommended as well.
You can read more here
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/sleep-aids/art-20047860
In case these do not help,
Here are few medications that are non addicting, that are used for sleep
Rozerem- this stimulates melatonin released from your brain
Trazadone- this is an antidepressant, But is also used for sleep. It is non-addictive.
Both of these medications are prescription. and need to be taken after discussion with your doctor,
Warm regards & stay safe

Set Your Sleep Schedule

Having a set schedule normalizes sleep as an essential part of your day and gets your brain and body accustomed to getting the full amount of sleep that you need.

Have a Fixed Wake-Up Time: Regardless of whether it’s a weekday or weekend, try to wake up at the same time since a fluctuating schedule keeps you from getting into a rhythm of consistent sleep.

Prioritize Sleep: It might be tempting to skip sleep in order to work, study, socialize, or exercise, but it’s vital to treat sleep as a priority. Calculate a target bedtime based on your fixed wake-up time and do your best to be ready for bed around that time each night.

Make Gradual Adjustments: If you want to shift your sleep times, don’t try to do it all in one fell swoop because that can throw your schedule out of whack. Instead, make small, step-by-step adjustments of up to an hour or two4 so that you can get adjusted and settle into a new schedule.

Don’t Overdo It With Naps: Naps can be a handy way to regain energy during the day, but they can throw off sleep at night. To avoid this, try to keep naps relatively short and limited to the early afternoon.

Follow a Nightly Routine

How you prepare for bed can determine how easily you’ll be able to fall asleep. A pre-sleep playbook including some of these tips can put you at ease and make it easier to get to fall asleep when you want to.

Keep Your Routine Consistent: Following the same steps each night, including things like putting on your pajamas and brushing your teeth, can reinforce in your mind that it’s bedtime.

Budget 30 Minutes For Winding Down: Take advantage of whatever puts you in a state of calm such as soft music, light stretching, reading, and/or relaxation exercises.

Dim Your Lights: Try to keep away from bright lights because they can hinder the production of melatonin, a hormone that the body creates to facilitate sleep.

Unplug From Electronics: Build in a 30-60 minute pre-bed buffer time that is device-free. Cell phones, tablets, and laptops cause mental stimulation that is hard to shut off and also generate blue light that may decrease melatonin production.

Test Methods of Relaxation: Instead of making falling asleep your goal, it’s often easier to focus on relaxation. Meditation, mindfulness, paced breathing, and other relaxation techniques can put you in the right mindset for bed.

Don’t Toss and Turn: It helps to have a healthy mental connection between being in bed and actually being asleep. For that reason, if after 20 minutes you haven’t gotten to sleep, get up and stretch, read, or do something else calming in low light before trying to fall asleep again.

Cultivate Healthy Daily Habits

It’s not just bedtime habits that play a part in getting good sleep. Incorporating positive routines during the day can support your circadian rhythm and limit sleep disruptions.

Get Daylight Exposure: Light, especially sunlight, is one of the key drivers of circadian rhythms that can encourage quality sleep.

Be Physically Active: Regular exercise can make it easier to sleep at night and also delivers a host of other health benefits.

Don’t Smoke: Nicotine stimulates the body in ways that disrupt sleep, which helps explain why smoking is correlated with numerous sleeping problems

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-hygiene

All this and what I discussed on the phone should help :)

Warm regards