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Dr. Bob
Dr. Bob, Neurologist (MD)
Category: Neurology
Satisfied Customers: 5762
Experience:  Neurology & Int Medicine (US Trained): 20 yrs experience
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HI In 2003 I had a ACDF and in 2005 laminectomy C3-C5. I suffer

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HI In 2003 I had a ACDF and in 2005 laminectomy C3-C5. I suffer from muscle stiffness and episodes of temporay leg /arm paralysis. Does my past history suggest nerve trauma as a cause of the paralysis? I am appealing a DWP descion not to place me in the support group but WRAG for ESA. What medical evidence do you think i should present at the likely tribunal?

Doctor-Bob :

Is the paralysis on one side or both?

Customer:

both sides but intermitent in nature duration varies 10 -30 mins. leg and arm movement affected

Doctor-Bob :

Do the legs and arms feel normal in between these episodes?

Customer:

normal is sensation of stiffness but able to move arms & leg to some degree

Doctor-Bob :

nerve trauma should not be causing your intermittent paralysis...after all, most nerves are able to heal over time...a more pressing concern would be the possibility of spinal stenosis, or intermittent pressure on the spinal cord, which could cause temporary symptoms in both the arms and the legs...have you had an MRI of the cervical spine recently to look for this?

Customer:

No MRI in last 3 years. It is over 5 years since my laminectomy which was successful in relieving pressure on spinal cord. Is there a time period in which problems start to reoccur

Doctor-Bob :

Once you have had a fusion and/or laminectomy the spine is no longer able to load forces as efficiently and effectively as before. As a result, there is often excess motion at certain points along the spinal column, especially just above and just below the fusion. This can lead to accelerated degenerative changes within a few years. This, in turn, can lead to instability and possibly spinal stenosis.

Customer:

bearing in mind the two operations is there anything I could do or is is it just a case of letting things deterioate further?

Doctor-Bob :

first, if there are new or progressing symptoms you should have another MRI done to document stability. Second, if you are not working with a physiotherapist, you should do so to make sure the neck muscles remain strong but supple. You might also inquire about electrical stimulation to help with your symptoms, pool therapy if appropriate, or inversion therapy if appropriate.

Customer:

Thanks for advice I will take it up. Any advice to offer on the DWP tribunal?

Doctor-Bob :

You're welcome. Not sure what the tribunal is all about, so I best not comment. Hope all works out for the best.

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