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Khizra Naz
Khizra Naz, GP
Category: OB GYN
Satisfied Customers: 2478
Experience:  GP training at St helens and knowsely trust (Acute Worcestershire Hospital Trust, Ul
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I have a question about entry pain, 19, haven't had

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I have a question about entry pain
JA: How old are you? What symptoms are you having?
Customer: 19, haven't had intercourse before. trying to with my boyfriend but it hurts a lot when he tries to enter. I can usually take only 1 finger
JA: Got it. When was your last smear test or pelvic exam? Any irregular results from past exams?
Customer: haven't had one
JA: Thank you so much for your time. Finally, is there anything else in your medical history you think the Doctor should know?
Customer: no

Hello My name is***** will try my best to help you.

I am sorry that you are going through this.

Have you had intercourse before? Or this is the first time?

Customer: replied 11 days ago.
first time
Customer: replied 11 days ago.
We've tried 3 times now
Customer: replied 11 days ago.
can you help?

You have vaginismus

Vaginismus is an involuntary tensing of the vagina. People experience it at the start of sex, while inserting a tampon or while getting a pelvic exam. Vaginismus can make intercourse painful (dyspareunia). Kegels, vaginal dilators and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help relax muscles and stop spasms.

Vaginismus is the involuntary tensing or contracting of muscles around the vagina. The vagina is part of the female reproductive system. It connects the lower part of the uterus (cervix) to the outside of the body.

These unintentional muscle spasms occur when something — a penis, finger, tampon or medical instrument — attempts to penetrate the vagina. The spasms may be mildly uncomfortable or very painful.

How is vaginismus managed or treated?

Vaginismus treatments focus on reducing the reflex of your muscles that causes them to tense up. Treatments also address anxieties or fears that contribute to vaginismus.

Your healthcare provider may recommend one or more of these treatments:

Topical therapy: Topical lidocaine or compounded creams may help with the pain associated with this condition.

Pelvic floor physical therapy: A physical therapist will teach you how to relax your pelvic floor muscles.

Vaginal dilator therapy: Vaginal dilators are tube-shaped devices that come in various sizes. Their primary purpose is to stretch the vagina. People with vaginismus use dilators to become more comfortable with, and less sensitive to, vaginal penetration. Your provider may recommend first applying a topical numbing cream to the outside of the vagina to make insertion easier.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): CBT helps you understand how your thoughts affect your emotions and behaviors. It’s an effective treatment for anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Sex therapy: Trained sex therapists work with individuals and couples to help them find pleasure again in their sexual relationships.

Khizra Naz and other OB GYN Specialists are ready to help you