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Tori, Psychologist
Tori, Psychologist, Psychologist
Category: Relationship
Satisfied Customers: 342
Experience:  Work/Coaching Psychologist & Therapist
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How to deal with jealousy?

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How to deal with jealousy?
Hello,

I've been working hard to find a Professional to assist you with your question, but sometimes finding the right Professional can take a little longer than expected.

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Thank you!

Hi, I wonder if I can offer some assistance.

This article can help to explain a little bit about the feelings and insecurities that lead to jealousy.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/close-encounters/201410/whats-really-behind-jealousy-and-what-do-about-it

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hello, I’m happy to wait for your answer ��

A powerful psychotherapy , called Thought Field Therapy can help to release and manage some of the negative thoughts, feelings and emotions around jealousy, to help you build more feelings of security and safety in your relationships, and to begin to see that you are worthy and good enough of positive relationships.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thank you. What is the process of thought field therapy? How is it done exactly?

Thought Field Therapy is recognised as a complementary therapy by the NHS. It utilises the same meridian system as is used in acupuncture, but instead of needles it uses tapping on the meridian points in a certain sequence to clear the negative build up of energy in the body that we experience as jealousy. I have attached a sheet here that explains how to do this therapy yourself at home. It can be used regularly to clear the feeling of jealousy and help to manage the associated behaviours.

To start he therapy, it really helps to rate the level of discomfort - jealousy, you are experiencing at the moment as you think about the situation you are experiencing, the "thought field", from 1 to 10, and then to notice any shift in this rating after completing the therapy. you can follow the tapping sequence 2-3 times, to get the best results from the therapy.

The gamut sequence in the therapy utilises the knowledge of eye movements to clear emotions, and helps to clear the negative feelings, or trauma, from both hemispheres of the brain.

Another effective way to help to re-frame the feelings of jealousy is through the use of self-hypnosis. This allows us to work at the deepest subconscious level of the mind, where jealousy is manifest. While the positive intention of jealousy is to protect us and keep us safe, the result tends to be to put strain on our minds, bodies, and our relationships - the very relationships we are trying to hold onto through jealousy, we can actually end up pushing away due to it;s detrimental effect on trust and intimacy. There are many apps and resources available for this, and one in particular is by Joseph Clough. Some are free, and some are paid for, but it is very good value for money, and has tracks specific to this issue. They are about 40 mns long, and when listened to regularly, can really help to adjust and re-frame the root cause of this behaviour, to help you to feel safer and more at ease.

Another good source of self-hypnosis tracks is www.hypnosisdownloads.com but there are many out there that you can try.

Listened to regularly, these can have profound effects on the way that we respond to situations that before may have caused us to feel vulnerable or insecure.

Do let me know if I can offer any further assistance.

Does that help to answer your question?

Tori, Psychologist, Psychologist
Category: Relationship
Satisfied Customers: 342
Experience: Work/Coaching Psychologist & Therapist
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