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Ask Dr. Michael Salkin Your Own Question
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin, Veterinarian
Category: Vet
Satisfied Customers: 42802
Experience:  University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 45 years of experience.
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My dog ate chocolate Assistant: I'll do all I can to help.

Customer Question

My dog ate chocolate
Assistant: I'll do all I can to help. The Expert will know if your dog will be able to digest that. What is your dog's name and age?
Customer: Qirov. He is 5
Assistant: What is the dog's name?
Customer: Qirov
Assistant: Is there anything else the Veterinarian should be aware of about Qirov?
Customer: No
Submitted: 1 month ago.
Category: Vet
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 month ago.

Dr. Michael Salkin is typing. Please be patient.

Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 month ago.

How much does Qirov weigh, how much chocolate was ingested (in grams or ounces), and was it milk, dark, or baker's chocolate, please?

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
He is a borzoi, around 40 kilos. He ate a whole package of chocolate brioche rolls (8 of them!) With dark chocolate chips. I cannot find an amount on the package
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 month ago.

Thank you. Thankfully, he would have needed to ingest at least 13 ounces of pure dark chocolate to intoxicate himself with the theobromine in chocolate: vomiting, agitation, tremors soon after ingestion. Those rolls didn't contain nearly such an amount. As with ingesting anything unusual, transient gastrointestinal distress in the form of inappetence, vomiting and/or diarrhea can arise but Qirov wasn't intoxicated and will remain safe. There's no need to induce emesis nor treat in any manner. Please respond with further questions or concerns.

I regret that my state board of veterinary examiners doesn't allow me to speak to customers by phone but other experts in this category may be able to assist you in this regard. Please let me know if you'd like another expert to do so and I'll opt out of this conversation. Please stay in the conversation if you wish.

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Ok, thank you
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 month ago.

You're quite welcome. I can't set a follow-up in this venue so please return to our conversation - even after rating - with an update at your convenience. You can bookmark this page for ease of return.